News / Middle East

    US Intensifies Mediation Efforts in Egypt

    U.S. Senator. John McCain and U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham shown on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 4, 2013. U.S. Senator. John McCain and U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham shown on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 4, 2013.
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    U.S. Senator. John McCain and U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham shown on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 4, 2013.
    U.S. Senator. John McCain and U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham shown on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 4, 2013.
    VOA News
    Two U.S. lawmakers and a top diplomat are in Cairo attempting to mediate an end to the standoff between Egypt's military-backed government and supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

    U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns met with a jailed senior leader of the Muslim Brotherhood after talks with the nation's interim leaders. U.S. Senators Lindsey Graham and John McCain are also expected to meet with the transitional military leadership.

    Burns met Khairat el-Shater, the deputy head of the Brotherhood, which supports  Morsi returning to power. The meeting was in the prison were the Islamist figure is being held, the Associated Press reported.

    The United States is urging all sides in Egypt to stop the violence and put together a transitional government that represents all sides.

    The interim government said Sunday it will put Muslim Brotherhood chief Mohammed Badie and Shater on trial August 25 on charges of inciting violence. Badie remain at large. The men are accused of starting violence that led to the deaths of protesters outside Brotherhood headquarters in June, days before the military overthrew Morsi on July 3.

    The Brotherhood and Morsi supporters have set up two large round-the-clock vigils in Cairo, demanding his reinstatement.

    Police helicopters dropped flyers over one of the camps Sunday, telling the protesters that the Brotherhood has "mentally kidnapped" them. The message says police will not harm demonstrators if they go home now.

    The interim government has threatened to break up the protest camps, but now says it wants to allow time for mediation.

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    by: Sani Aliyu Hunkuyi(Mr.) from: Nigeria
    August 07, 2013 12:35 PM
    Morsi had taken office for only a year ago and became Egypt's first freely democratically elected president. The US President Obama deserves commendation for facilitating the mediation efforts of well respected U.S. Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham. We hope therefore the US Executive arm of government will take their findings and recommendations seriously. The USA Government should insist on allowing the Egypt's new constitution to continue and limit President Mohamed Morsi's tenure to two four-year terms, replacing the possibility of endless regimes of former president Hosni Mubarak. If after four years the citizens of Egypt find it necessary to replace President Morsi for an opposition candidate then let it be.

    The Brotherhood had always said that ‘Islam is the solution’ (their most famous slogan worldwide), a remedy they insist can be realized only through democratic principles. I do not see any problem in a majority Islamic country(Egypt) not allowing at least for a trial, the performance of President Morsi in his first tenure of four years being considered in the revised constitution. The critics of Muslim Brotherhood led government, who are believed to be working for the interest of Israelite, should bring out a list of their fears in the new Egyptian Constitution. The list should be agreed to be removed in the Constitution as a condition for the re-reinstatement of President Morsi. The Muslim Brotherhood should for sake of reaching a reconciliation with the Egyptian Military Junta, accept to incorporate whatever clause that is not totally against Islam in the new Egyptian Constitution.

    by: Sani Aliyu Hunkuyi(Mr.) from: Nigeria
    August 05, 2013 10:38 PM
    I commend the good initiative of lawmakers of the Legislative House of the United States for the efforts towards ending the violence in Egypt. The mediation move should include the identification of Muslim scholars and clerics with Islamic intellectual power to influence the leaders of Muslim Brotherhood that are proving to be difficult. Yusuf Al Qaradawi is reported as a very influential Egyptian scholar and a founder of the website IslamOnline.net, and one of the intellectual leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood movement, and the most influential leader associated with the movement since Mahdi Akef stepped down from his position as Supreme Leader in January 2010.

    Himself or any Islamic intellectual leader believed to be behind the scenes, who influence the leadership particularly those Muslim Brotherhood members with strong views should be brought to the negotiation table. Ideally if not because of air of arrogance likely to be exhibited by the Military Junta of not accepting to re-instate the ousted President Morsi but the ideal thing to be requested by American lawmakers being democratic leaders from the World's most respected democratic country (i.e U.S.A) is to insist that Morsi be re-instated. The next thing to be negotiated with the Islamic Clerics and the leaders of Muslim Brotherhood is the contentious areas of the Egyptian Constitution which the Anti-Islamic law (shari’a) people are against which the Muslims Brotherhood are not prepared to compromise and those areas to be deferred for future consideration.

    The issue of putting Muslim Brotherhood chief Mohammed Badie and Shater on trial August 25 on charges of inciting violence should for now be suspended to allow reconciliation process to take place. The U.S. Senators Lindsey Graham and John McCain to meet with the transitional military leadership should make the Military see reasons in allowing the removal or change of democratically elected government to done democratically. I personally see no reason why the majority Egyptians not allowed to decide the future and style of government they want whether Islamic or Western style.

    by: nik from: US
    August 05, 2013 2:12 PM
    Egypt will not attain democracy until the army and its financing is brought under civilian control.
    In Response

    by: Plain Mirror Intl from: Plain Planet - Africa
    August 06, 2013 3:47 AM
    nik is far from realities. Egypt would not also get peace if Mohamed Morsi gets back to sit. Infact that is something that would not happen. Kindly get an elementary school there in US where Morsi would be absorbed so that he would be thought the true definition of democracy. Morsi knows not the definition of democracy not to tak of its principles.

    by: Rose from: Canada
    August 05, 2013 10:19 AM
    I hope the first question the MB asks any US representative is why the US claims to support democracy but has no problem supporting the Egyptian military coup that overthrew a democractically elected government.
    In Response

    by: Plain Mirror Intl from: Plain Planet - Africa
    August 06, 2013 4:00 AM
    Response no.1 is that the US, France an UN support the removal of anybody they do not need in power whether democratically elected or not.
    Response no.2 is that Mohamed Morsi and the MB do not know the definition of democracy nor its principles.
    Response no.3 is that the MB has proven that it is a cult of islamists and not a democratic body.
    Response no.4 is that the army is not in power but only facilitated the implementation of the will of the people which is the democracy in action.
    I hope Rose from Canada is cleared now. Greetings!
    In Response

    by: ali baba from: new york
    August 06, 2013 2:30 AM
    I have to tell anwer in Canada. leave Canada and live in Afghanistan and enjoy the Islamic democracy
    In Response

    by: ali baba from: new york
    August 06, 2013 2:25 AM
    I hope you understand that democracy does not exist in middle east. the best leaders in middle east are dictators. the concept of democracy does not match with the mentality of middle eastern people. get education before you write . you are acting like us policy maker
    In Response

    by: Rose from: Canada
    August 05, 2013 1:23 PM
    AQ is more likely to establish a Caliph then the MB, yet the Us wants to supply them weapons in Syria. And the only reason Morsi ousted the courts was because they were blocking democratic reform. Try doing some real research instead of swallowing the propaganda put out by the US media. BTW, I'm still waiting for SOMEONE, ANYONE, to explain to me how the fuel and food shortages during Morsi's governiong majically disappeared as soon as the military coup took place. And yes, it was a coup.
    In Response

    by: RC from: NC
    August 05, 2013 11:34 AM
    Because the MB's ultimate goal is to establish a World Caliphate. Read about the MB in Wikipedia and other sources. They tried to use democratic processes to gain power, then impose their brand of authoritarianism on all. They have no use for pluralistic democracy. The majority of Egyptians ultimately rejected this brand of authoritarianism. Time to push the reset button and try again before it's too late.
    In Response

    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    August 05, 2013 11:22 AM
    And the reply is "because the Muslim Brotherhood used democratic institution to foster undemocratic rule".
    In Response

    by: Anwar Syed from: Canada
    August 05, 2013 11:11 AM
    I agree with Rose, why these double standards, who is Abdullah Al-Sisi anyway, is he a protege of Hosni Mubarak who has thrown the democratic revolution behind his back with the might of military and police brutality a threat against peaceful demonstrators..Is he another Bashar Al Assad graduating from the school of tyranny to divide and oppress the various section of one's nation, calling some terrorists and some as patriots !! USA shoud not support this usurper of Power !!!
    In Response

    by: Matt from: USA
    August 05, 2013 11:03 AM
    This is NOT a military Coup. By definition, the military would be in political power after overthrowing a government. They handed the government to an interim government after 30 plus million spoke against the theocratic government of the MB. The world needs to stop interfering with Egypt. The people of Egypt have spoken (which is a true democracy). Just because one group is elected, it doesn't mean they are not held accountable for their actions!

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