News / USA

Reports: Suspect Says Boston Bombing Not Linked to Any Group

Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)      Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)
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Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)
Photos of the two suspects near the finish line of Boston Marathon. (Courtesy Bob Leonard)
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Reuters
U.S. investigators say that preliminary evidence from interviews with the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect suggest that he and his brother were motivated by Islamic religious extremism, but not linked to any terrorist groups.

U.S. news agencies reported Tuesday that government sources say that accused bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has told them that he and his older brother Tamerlan acted alone. They were moved to set off the twin explosions at last week's race, the sources said, by a feeling that Islam is under attack and needed to be defended.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev died after a shootout with police late Thursday, while Dzhokhar was captured a day later. With a throat wound that was possibly self-inflicted, the younger Tsarnaev has been unable to speak with investigators, but has answered their questions in writing and with nods of his head.

Investigators cautioned that they are in the early stages of figuring out what led to the blasts near the finish line of last week's race that killed three people and wounded more than 250. CNN quoted one government source as saying that initially the Tsarnaev brothers fit the description of self-radicalized jihadists, with 19-year-old Dzhokhar saying that his 26-year-old brother was the driving force behind the attack.

The two brothers share a Chechen heritage, but both have lived in the United States for much of the last decade. U.S. authorities are investigating the older brother's six-month trip to Russia last year to try to determine whether he met with a suspected militant.

At Russia's request, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation interviewed the older Tsarnaev brother several times about his possible radicalization, but found nothing suspicious.

The U.S. charged Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on Monday with using a weapon of mass destruction and malicious destruction of property, both of which carry the possibility of the death penalty or life imprisonment if he is convicted. The charges were read to him in his hospital room.

The judge who read the charges to Tsarnaev said she found him to be "alert, mentally competent and lucid."

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by: markjuliansmith from: Australia
April 23, 2013 9:41 PM
Reports: Suspect Says Boston Bombing Not Linked to Any Group

The suspects are clearly linked to Muslims as a group. Where else have they learnt to justify such a behavior - culture determines the behaviour of an individual not the other way around.

If Islamic cultural foundation codex (textual and behavioral) did not in time and space consistently inform terror against Other, even against fellow adherents, within the variance of Muslim behavior you could accept Utah Muslims assertion 'suspects perverted Islam'.

Empirical observation of the direct connection between continuing and consistent terrorist behavior against Other across the globe on the part of Muslims makes this assertion completely false, therefore it is completely the reverse 'Islam perverted suspects '.

Indonesian research indicates there is no discernible leap to being an Islamic terrorist liberal moderate extremist terrorist are part and parcel of the same Islamic ethical construction of Other so it is very difficult if not impossible to identify an Islamic terrorist by their public and even private behavior.

The answer as it has always been change the Islamic construct of Other as deaf dumb and blind, unable to be reasoned with, evil, etc destined for severest penalty or the terror continues Afghan war or no Afghan war.

The Islamic attacks on Christians in Indonesia and elsewhere have absolutely nothing to do with the Afghan war this is a cultural war and given the global nature of culture the attack could have just as well occurred in Brisbane as Boston anywhere the Other culture exists - for Islamic terror is a conversion message from one culture to another culture not to a State.

Terror is a conversion tool authorized by a cultural codex to convert Other or kill them get rid of the authorization get rid of the terror.

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