News / USA

US Involvement in Nigeria Is Critical, House Hearing Told

Nigerian Teenager Tells US Congress Boko Haram Killed Familyi
X
May 22, 2014 2:14 AM
President Obama has informed Congress that the United States is deploying about 80 military personnel to Chad as part of its effort to help find and return more than 270 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by the Islamist militant group Boko Haram. As VOA Congressional Correspondent Cindy Saine reports, the pledge came on the same day as a powerful visit to Capitol Hill by a survivor of a Boko Haram attack.

Watch video report by VOA Congressional correspondent Cindy Saine.

Mia BushCindy Saine
A15-year-old girl, the sole survivor of an attack on her family by Boko Haram, served as the emotional centerpiece of a House hearing on the terrorist group on Wednesday.

The House Foreign Affairs Committee questioned State and Defense department officials about the administration’s response to recent attacks by Boko Haram in Nigeria, including the abduction of nearly 300 schoolgirls.

U.S. Rep. Ed Royce, chairman of the committee, said U.S. involvement in finding and rescuing the schoolgirls, who were abducted from a school in Chibok on April 14, is critical.

“We are faced with two challenges in northern Nigeria. In the near-term, seeing these schoolgirls rescued. And in the long term, rendering Boko Haram unable to threaten the region. This is a group that has killed more than 600 students and teachers and destroyed some 500 schools,” he said.

Royce said U.S. forces are well-positioned in the region and are well-trained to advise and assist Nigerian forces in the search for the girls.

He said that while the world is deliberating on what to do about the kidnapped girls, more girls are being taken, more attacks have occurred and more schools are being destroyed.

"Expanding their terror"

"The difficulty is that Boko Haram is in a process of expanding their terror, and the frequency of these attacks, the attacks on girls. That has been an evolution. I mean as they have intimidated and frightened the Nigerian military, they are now to the point where a lot of military units have run away," Royce said.

Boko Haram has killed thousands of Nigerians over the past five years.

Sarah Sewall, a senior official with the U.S. Department of State, said a U.S. team of military and civilian experts is working with Nigerian officials in Abuja. They are providing assistance in intelligence, military planning, hostage negotiations and communications.

“This effort is one that is extremely difficult and, as we know from our own experience, may take far longer than we would like,” Sewall said.

Similar to Royce, Sewall said the State Department is looking at Nigeria with both short- and long-term goals.

The immediate concern is finding and returning the schoolgirls abducted in Chibok last month, Sewall said.

Long-term efforts against Boko Haram

Long term, Sewall said the State Department is discussing with Nigerian officials concrete ideas on how to defeat Boko Haram, such as improving cooperation on border security, countering violent extremism, and redoubling efforts to promote economic growth and create jobs in the affected region.

“While the kidnapping in Chibok has cast a spotlight on Boko Haram, I want to emphasize that we have long been working to help the people of Nigeria and the Nigerian government address this terrorist threat,” she said in her opening remarks.

Amanda Dory, deputy assistant secretary of Defense for African Affairs, echoed Sewall.

“Our intent is to support Nigerian-led efforts to secure the girls and a greater importance to protect Nigerian civilians,” Dory said.

She said that military efforts alone can’t be used against Boko Haram. “Nigeria’s political leaders must play a role as well.”

Last week, Robert Jackson, a State Department specialist on Africa, told a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee that Nigeria objected to the U.S. formally listing Boko Haram as a foreign terrorist organization (FTO) in 2012.

Jackson was speaking to a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee, responding to Republican criticism that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton decided against making that designation in 2012, which would have imposed certain sanctions.

At the time, several U.S. agencies, including intelligence services and the Justice Department, were pushing for the FTO designation, saying the group met the criteria and was becoming a growing threat, not only to Nigerians but to U.S. interests in West Africa, according to the AP.

After similar questions were raised in the House hearing Wednesday, Rep. Eliot Engel, the leading Democrat on the Foreign Affairs Committee, said it was “absurd” to think that an earlier FTO designation would have prevented the kidnapping last month in Chibok.

But he said the U.S. must do more in the search for the girls.

“We believe very strongly that the United States in conjunction with other countries must do everything possible to free those girls. We have technology and other things available to us that other countries don't have that we believe should be utilized in a joint international effort to bring the girls home,'' he said.

Dory said, “It’s fair to say that we work closely with host nation governments” regarding FTO designation. “Regardless of the designation issue, Boko Haram had certainly been on the radar screen … since it emerged in Nigeria years ago.”

She added that some host countries may be reluctant to have groups be labeled FTOs because of the added attention they might receive.

Survivor tells her story

Before the hearing, legislators heard from Deborah Peter, a 15-year-old girl who survived an attack on her family in the same village from which the girls were abducted.

Peter told the story of how her father was targeted by Boko Haram because he was a Christian pastor in Chibok, VOA’s Cindy Saine reported Wednesday.

Peter said three men came to her home on Dec. 22, 2011, and asked her father to renounce his Christian faith. When he refused, they shot him in front of her and her 14-year-old brother. She was 12 at the time.

Afterward, they debated whether to kill her brother. She said Boko Haram members decided to kill him because they thought he might grow up to become a pastor, too.

Peter, now 15, came to the United States with the help of a Christian organization and is attends Mt. Mission School in Grundy, Va.

You May Like

Ebola Death Toll Nears 5,000 as Virus Advances

West Africa bears heaviest burden; Mali toddler’s death raises new fears More

Jordan’s Battle With Islamic State Militants Carries Domestic Risks

Despite Western concerns that IS militants are preparing a Jordanian offensive, analysts call the kingdom's solid intel a strong deterrent More

Asian-Americans Assume Office in Record Numbers

Steadily deepening engagement in local politics pays off for politicians like Chinese-American Judy Chu More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Godwin from: Nigeria
May 22, 2014 11:20 AM
As critical as it can get. The snag there is about involvement of the Nigerian security apparatus. The Abbotabad, Pakistan issue with the tracking and capture/killing of Osama bin Laden should be a good tutor to how to handle the issue of security collaboration with the Nigerian government, for it can get worse than the Pakistan case - the natives and security outfit working for the miscreants. Simply stated, these Nigerian operatives cannot be trusted. If the US is in the country to do anything - of course there is no government - let them do business as it ought to be done. But there w9ill be uproars like happened after bin Laden had been liquidated in Pakistan - both from a "non-existent government" asking why it was not first consulted, and the natives perhaps alluding to and alleging false accusations what may not have been done right - let the end just the means out here. If the girls are found, and the insurgency quelled, anything else is by the way. Nigeria needs freedom from those dogs called boko haram and anyway it comes, peace has no collateral.


by: M.Abdul Naser from: Bangladesh
May 21, 2014 4:09 PM
I do believe that the US has the ability to cope up or to deal carefully the African extremisom erupted and cultivated by Nigerian so called political bands for having extreme power to rule poor Nigerian brothers .I am very much shocked to follow & go through the Nigerian Govts in activity to speedy recovery and any kind of rescue operations of the abducted innocent sisters.No visible military operation has so far taken by their govt till today,though Nigerian govt.pretended they have the largest & advanced military power which can secure peace & stability in other African nations.I have prayed to Almighty Allah to give the true power & strength to the US govt to take an early & safe rescue efforts of the abducted girls as the Americans are only nation for safe guarding humanity and Allah has given them all kind of blessings in this world.Please rescue the girls intact and destroy all powers & ability of so called Bokoharam.


by: Steve Holmes from: Connecticut
May 21, 2014 3:27 PM
Sounds like another opportunity to pour money, resources and lives into one of the most corrupt governments in the world in hope that we can solve the problems they should beaddressing themselves.


by: Harry Kuheim from: USA
May 21, 2014 3:10 PM
Go to Hell Africa...we have sent you Billions since the 1950's and not a single thing has improved...you've NEVER done anything for us but call us Racists, Colonialists, and Imperialists.

In Response

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
May 22, 2014 11:29 AM
Has anyone said that because you have another rescue mission in Africa you should be removed from the list of racists, colonialists and imperialists? It doesn't work that way. But you are the same that siphoned our resources then, why not use part of it to rescue us now, after all all our able-bodied men and women were stolen to your country before, during and after the colonial period. Nor have you stopped colonizing us and others. But we are foolish though, that's why you continue to exploit us despite everything. In recent times it is called brain-drain.

In Response

by: Peter from: Benin city Nigeria
May 22, 2014 3:51 AM
To hell with u Harry or woteva u call urself.who send una.Ozuo!!!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
October 25, 2014 4:21 PM
Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukraine

Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Smugglers Offer Cheap Passage From Turkey to Syria

Smugglers in Turkey offer a relatively cheap passage across the border into Syria. Ankara has stepped up efforts to stem the flow of foreign fighters who want to join Islamic State militants fighting for control of the Syrian border city of Kobani. But porous borders and border guards who can be bribed make illegal border crossings quite easy. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video Comanche Chief Quanah Parker’s Century-Old House Falling Apart

One of the most fascinating people in U.S. history was Quanah Parker, the last chief of the American Indian tribe, the Comanche. He was the son of a Comanche warrior and a white woman who had been captured by the Indians. Parker was a fierce warrior until 1875 when he led his people to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and took on a new, peaceful life. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Cache, Oklahoma, Quanah’s image remains strong among his people, but part of his heritage is in danger of disappearing.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.
Video

Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Ebola Orphanage Opens in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. Adam Bailes reports for VOA about a new interim care center that's aimed at helping the growing number of children affected by Ebola.

All About America

AppleAndroid