News / Asia

US Navy Sends Aid to Philippines Typhoon Victims

U.S. sailors of the USS Antietam (CG-54) from the George Washington Battle Group stand on the deck before sailing to the Philippines at Hong Kong Victoria Harbor, Nov. 12, 2013.
U.S. sailors of the USS Antietam (CG-54) from the George Washington Battle Group stand on the deck before sailing to the Philippines at Hong Kong Victoria Harbor, Nov. 12, 2013.
Daniel Schearf
The U.S. Navy has sent a Japan-based aircraft carrier strike group to the Philippines to step up relief efforts following the devastating typhoon Haiyan.  The record-setting storm is estimated to have killed more than 10,000 people and left hundreds of thousands in need of food, water, shelter, and medical care.  The Navy ships are well-equipped for disaster relief and aim to provide as much humanitarian aid as they can.

The USS George Washington aircraft carrier ended its port visit to Hong Kong early, setting out Tuesday afternoon to help the Philippines with typhoon disaster relief.
 
The U.S. Navy's only forward-deployed carrier in Asia was joined by four of its escort ships, two destroyers and two cruisers.  They are expected to arrive Wednesday night, at the earliest, off the coast of the typhoon-ravaged central Philippines. 
 
They will be joined by at least two more U.S. Navy ships, another destroyer that just ended exercises off the coast of India, and a supply ship.
 
Commander William Marks, a spokesman for the U.S. 7th fleet, says altogether they carry 21 helicopters, medical facilities, and can convert seawater into drinking water.
 
“The helicopters, which provide logistic support-getting things both in and out.  We also have on board the carrier a significant medical capability," Marks said. "So, we can provide a lot of treatment both there on the carrier and on land.  In addition, we have the ability to make water.  And, that's one of the things that's most critically needed, usually, is water.”
 
The aircraft carrier's distilling plants can hold 1.5 million liters of water, enough to supply 2,000 homes. 
 
Marks says the carrier group, and two P-3 patrol aircraft already in action, can better coordinate search and rescue operations. 
 
  • People line up to be evacuated outside Tacloban airport, central Philippines, Nov. 13, 2013.
  • A survivor wipes his face under a Philippines national flag in Tacloban, central Philippines, Nov. 13, 2013.
  • Members of a Philippines rescue team carry corpses in body bags as they search for the dead in Tacloban, central Philippines, Nov. 13, 2013.
  • A rescue team wades into flood waters to retrieve a body in Tacloban, central Phillipines, Nov. 13, 2013.
  • Typhoon survivors hang signs from their necks as they line up to try to board a C-130 military transport plane in Tacloban, Nov. 12, 2013.
  • Typhoon survivors jostle to get a chance to board a C-130 military transport plane in Tacloban, Nov. 12, 2013.
  • A Philippine air force officer hands out orange slices to typhoon survivors as they line up to board a C-130 military transport plane in Tacloban city, Nov. 12, 2013.
  • Tacloban residents wait for military flights inside the terminal of Tacloban airport, Nov. 12, 2013.
  • Typhoon survivors rush to get a chance to board a C-130 military transport plane in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Nov. 12, 2013.
  • Survivors walk in typhoon ravaged Tacloban city, Nov. 12, 2013.
  • An aerial view of the ruins of houses after the devastation of super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban city in central Philippines, Nov. 11, 2013.
  • Survivors carry bags of rice from a warehouse they stormed to get food after the typhoon, Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Nov. 11, 2013.

The Philippines and U.S. militaries have been using planes and helicopters to drop emergency food and water supplies into the hard-to-reach areas but the scale of the devastation is overwhelming.
 
Eleven million people were affected and 600,000 displaced by typhoon Haiyan, known locally as Yolanda.
 
The most powerful typhoon recorded making landfall, it flooded large parts of the central Philippines and left them without water or power.
 
Bodies are strewn among uprooted trees and other debris that clog roads, stopping aid convoys.
 
Captain Cassandra Gesecki is a U.S. Marines spokeswoman in the Philippines.  She said road damage and uprooted trees make it enormously difficult getting supplies where they are needed most.

International Relief Efforts Picking up in Typhoon-Hit Philippinesi
X
November 12, 2013 3:06 PM
The USS George Washington, an American aircraft carrier with 5,000 sailors and more than 80 aircraft on board, is headed to the Philippines as part of efforts to accelerate aid to typhoon-ravaged areas of the country, where 10,000 people are feared dead and many more displaced. Richard Green has more on the aftermath of the disaster.
Related video report by Richard Green
 
"Right now we have about 180 US forces on the ground," Gesecki said. "The majority of it are Marines from Okinawa, but we're also supplemented here by Army, there's a few Navy and Air Force folks helping us out. Whatever the Philippines need and whatever they request is what we're trying to provide for them."
 
The Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and international aid groups have been distributing the emergency supplies.
 
On Tuesday the Philippines added five more helicopters to the six already operating in Tacloban City, one of the areas hardest hit. 
 
A total of 1,000 Philippine troops were deployed to clear the roads.
 
Others are struggling to restore order as the desperate loot remnants of stores and homes in search of food and water.
 
Dozens of nations have contributed tens of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid, but some others are also contributing troops to help with disaster relief.
 
Britain is sending one of its navy destroyers from Singapore with a helicopter and equipment to make drinking water.
 
Israel sent a medical team that included members of the Israeli defense forces.  Even Japan, which invaded the Philippines during World War II, is sending 40 members of its Self-Defense Forces emergency relief team. 
 
Tokyo already sent a team of 25 medical staff earlier in the week at the invitation of Manila.

Victor Beattie in Washington contributed to this report

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by: GK from: PHL
November 13, 2013 9:37 PM
Thank you for helping us UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Thank you for helping us JAPAN
Thank you for helping us ISRAEL
Thank you for helping us UK
Thank you for helping us AUSTRALIA
Thank you for helping us GERMANY
Thank you for helping us CANADA
Thank you for helping us SOUTH KOREA
Thank you for helping us UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Thank you for helping us KUWAIT
Thank you for helping us SPAIN
Thank you for helping us NEW ZEALAND
Thank you for helping us MALAYSIA
Thank you for helping us INDONESIA
Thank you for helping us SINGAPORE
Thank you for helping us INDIA
Thank you for helping us BELGIUM
Thank you for helping us HUNGARY
Thank you for helping us NORWAY
Thank you for helping us MEXICO
Thank you for helping us VIETNAM
Thank you for helping us TAIWAN
Thank you for helping us CHINA
Thank you for helping us CHILE
Thank you for helping us DENMARK
Thank you for helping us NETHERLANDS
Thank you for helping us RUSSIA
Thank you for helping us SAUDI ARABIA
Thank you for helping us SWEDEN
Thank you for helping us TURKEY
Thank you for helping us VATICAN
Thank you for helping us ASEAN
Thank you for helping us EUROPEAN UNION
Thank you for helping us UNITED NATIONS
Thank you for helping us whoever you are wherever you are from!!!
-- from the people of the Philippines


by: Caroline Balariz from: Connecticut
November 12, 2013 8:45 PM
We, Filipinos, are filled with gratitude for the countries and people who had extended their help at this difficult time! Maraming-maraming salamat po!


by: Arvin Mundo from: Los Angeles
November 12, 2013 12:09 PM
Thank you for all the nations that sent help to the Philippines. Thank you so much America, and to the 2 little girls selling lemonade in Los Angeles, CA for the victims of Yolanda, may God Bless your Kind Hearts.

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