News / Asia

Australia: MH370 Didn't Crash Near Where Pings Were Heard

FILE - The United States said last weekend that it would only contribute its sophisticated Bluefin-21 underwater drone for one more month in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
FILE - The United States said last weekend that it would only contribute its sophisticated Bluefin-21 underwater drone for one more month in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.
VOA News
Location of detected pings, Malaysian Airlines MH 370.Location of detected pings, Malaysian Airlines MH 370.
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Location of detected pings, Malaysian Airlines MH 370.
Location of detected pings, Malaysian Airlines MH 370.
Australian authorities have concluded the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 did not crash in the area of the southern Indian Ocean where electronic signals were detected last month.
 
The estimation was made Thursday following the final mission of a miniature, unmanned submarine that was scanning the ocean floor off the southwest coast of Australia.
 
In a statement, the Joint Agency Coordination Center said the Bluefin-21 submarine found no signs of aircraft debris during its search of 850 square kilometers of ocean floor.

​It said the Australian Transport Safety Board has made a professional judgment that the area "can now be discounted as the final resting place" of the Malaysia Airlines flight.
 
Flight MH370 Timeline
 
  • Mar. 8: Contact lost less than one hour after departing Kuala Lumpur for Beijing   
  • Mar. 10: Search radius expanded, China urges Malaysia to speed up investigation
  • Mar. 12: Chinese satellite images of possible debris are released and determined not to be related to the plane
  • Mar. 14: Media reports say MH370 communications system continued to ping a satellite hours after plane disappeared
  • Mar. 15:  Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak says someone on MH370 likely turned off its communications systems
  • Mar. 20: Australian aircraft investigate possible debris in remote area of southern Indian Ocean
    Mar. 24: Razak says new analysis indicates MH370 crashed in Indian Ocean
  • Mar. 28: Search shifts more than 1,000 kilometers northeast in Indian Ocean following new "credible lead"
  • April 1: Malaysia releases full transcript of last exchanges with MH370
  • April 2: Malaysia says all flight MH370 passengers have been cleared of wrongdoing
  • April 4-6: Chinese and Australian ships report hearing signals in different parts of search area
  • April 14: Australia deploys mini-sub to aid search
  • May 1: Malaysia report says it took 17 minutes to realize MH370 had gone off radar
  • May 27: Malaysia releases raw satellite data used to calculate search area
  • May 29: Australia concludes plane did not crash near where pings were heard
The Boeing 777 was carrying 239 people when it disappeared from radar without a distress call on March 8, about a half hour after departing Kuala Lumpur for Beijing.
 
The news comes a day after a U.S. Navy official cast doubt on whether the electronic signals that led searchers to deploy the robotic submarine really emanated from the missing plane.

Navy deputy director of ocean engineering Michael Dean told CNN authorities almost universally believe the so-called "pings" did not come from the plane's black box or cockpit voice recorders, as initially thought.
 
Dean said the signals probably came from another man-made source, such as a nearby ship or from within the electronics of the towed pinger locator that was searching for the signals.
 
A Navy spokesman, Chris Johnson, dismissed Dean's remarks as "speculative and premature." In an e-mail, he said the U.S. and others continue to work to "more thoroughly understand the data."
 
Authorities used a series of transmissions between the plane and a communications satellite to determine that the jet crashed in the remote part of the Indian Ocean.
 
There, a U.S. Navy pinger locator towed by an Australian ship detected a series of signals believed to come from the plane's black box. But an extensive search of the ocean floor failed to produce any trace of the jet.
 
Malaysian authorities, along with the British company Inmarsat, this week released the raw satellite data used to narrow the search. Many family members of those missing hope independent analysis of the data can provide more clues about the plane's location.
 
Satellite data is not normally used to determine a missing plane’s location, but investigators had little other choice because the plane's communications devices were either disabled or malfunctioned during the flight.
 
Malaysian authorities believe someone with an in-depth knowledge of airplane systems intentionally diverted the jet, but an investigation of the pilots and passengers has not yielded any solid leads.

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Comments
     
by: Mark Gresko from: baytown tx
May 30, 2014 2:13 AM
Now when your fling in a plane from A to B and when you land at point B don't you think they would refill fuel before departing the airport and second thing that bugs me why won't they tell the families the truth on what really happened to flight 370 it seems a little off to me that some company from another country can show images of a plane in the water they need to find that company and show those pictures to the right poeple and maybe they will find there missing plane


by: Michael Cohen from: Florida
May 29, 2014 10:25 PM
Here is what really a happened to the plane: it was blown up by authorities because its two Muslim pilots were on a suicide mission to crash the plane into the buildings in Kuala Lumpur. How did they know it was on a suicide mission? Because they followed the example of the four Muslim pilots in the 911 attacks::
1. They cut all voice communication
2. They disabled the electronics and tracking systems
3. They illegally changed course from north to west.
When they changed course they were only 20 minutes from downtown and its huge office buildings so the decision was made to destroy the aircraft. The wreckage was secretly collected and all the rescue planes and ships sent on a wild goose chase thousands of miles away.
After 911 the countries of the world realized that these attacks cannot happen again and they decided, secretly, to destroy any aircraft which could be on a suicide run.
2.


by: Carl Williams from: U.S.A.
May 29, 2014 2:45 AM
Why don't the U.S. navy use a submarine to look for the plane? How is it that the flight crew can turn off the flight recorder? The families of the passangers should sue the airline! This gives an indication of security breaches. They should keep looking with the mini-sub.

In Response

by: Prano segund from: Asia
May 29, 2014 10:03 AM
Even "blind Freddy" could see it was not in that area. 2-pings 600km. apart??? no wreckage?? The Aussie survey company are on the ball; - Look in the Bay of Bengal! The USA and others know the truth, but it must remain hidden in the interests of world peace and western military control....

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