News / Africa

PM: CAR Will Move Up Presidential Election

Prime Minister of the Central African Republic Nicolas Tiangaye speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, in Paris, France, Dec. 5, 2013.
Prime Minister of the Central African Republic Nicolas Tiangaye speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, in Paris, France, Dec. 5, 2013.
VOA News
The prime minister of the Central African Republic has announced plans to speed up a transition of power, as the country deals with deadly unrest.

Prime Minister Nicolas Tiangaye said the presidential election that originally was set for 2015 will take place next year instead.

He said a new national election authority will be sworn in by early next week.

There was no immediate comment from the CAR's interim president, Michel Djotodia.

The prime minister spoke to reporters on Thursday, after a meeting in the capital, Bangui, with U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power speaks to IDP women at the makeshift camp where over 40,000 found refuge at the airport in Bangui, Central African Republic, Dec. 19, 2013.U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power speaks to IDP women at the makeshift camp where over 40,000 found refuge at the airport in Bangui, Central African Republic, Dec. 19, 2013.
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U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power speaks to IDP women at the makeshift camp where over 40,000 found refuge at the airport in Bangui, Central African Republic, Dec. 19, 2013.
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power speaks to IDP women at the makeshift camp where over 40,000 found refuge at the airport in Bangui, Central African Republic, Dec. 19, 2013.
Power, who is on a one-day visit to the CAR, told VOA that she is urging the country's leaders to work together.

"When people see division among the leaders, it sends a signal that the society is divided and so, they need to show unity," she said.

Power also said that those who have committed atrocities must be held accountable. "People have suffered in this country and if they don't feel as if their suffering and their pain is being taken into account, the risk is that they will seek to do justice themselves."

 VOA correspondent Idrissa Fall, who is in Bangui, said gunfire could be heard in the capital, where a nighttime curfew is in effect. He said the source of the shooting was unclear.

The CAR slipped into chaos after mostly Muslim rebels, known as Seleka, toppled president Francois Bozize in March. Months of looting and killing have brought retaliation by Bozize allies and Christian militias known as anti-balaka.

Human rights groups expressed renewed alarm over the situation Thursday.

Amnesty International said more than 1,000 people had been killed in Bangui since violence flared earlier this month. The death toll is significantly higher than what had been reported by relief organizations.

Human Rights Watch issued a report saying the Christian militias have committed atrocities against Muslims in a cycle of violence that "threatens to spin out of control."

The group highlighted alleged brutality by the militias in Ouham province, where it said fighters have slit the throats of women and children.

Peter Bouckaert, emergencies director for Human Rights Watch, said there is a high potential for more mass violence.

"We documented many cases in which both Christians and Muslims were targeted because of their religion and their attackers made statements like, 'We will kill all the Muslims in the country.' We've documented where children as young as three years old had their throats cut by the attackers. So we're talking about extreme violence and communal violence. And once that communal violence sets in, it's very difficult to stop," said Bouckaert.

French and African Union troops in Bangui are attempting to stop the violence and restore order.

The African Union [AU] recently boosted the planned number of troops in an African-led support mission in CAR, known as MISCA, from about 3,600 to 6,000 troops.

The transfer of troop authority from the Economic Community of Central African States to MISCA is taking place on Thursday.

AU spokesman El Ghassim Wane said MISCA's leadership already has begun work in Bangui.

The White House said Thursday the U.S. is providing up to $101 million in assistance to CAR to help restore security.

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Comments
     
by: manns
December 19, 2013 10:06 AM
I can't stand how the lame, PC media tries to hide the fact the the people instigating and mostly committing the acts of violence are muslims. The VOA in this article is trying to equally blame Christians and Muslims for the violence so they can appear to not be anti-Muslim. But they took it too far like most PC media

In Response

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
December 21, 2013 12:05 AM
I don't believe the media is hiding the true facts what's happening in CAR. According to Human Rights Watch reported the Christian Militias attacked unarmed civilians with "shocking brutality".
I strongly believe that both armed militias of Christians and Muslims are equally committed horrific acts of cowardice. The World ought to bring these merciless criminals to justice and punished.

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