News / Middle East

Brahimi: US Blocks Iran From Syria Peace Talks

Lakhdar Brahimi (C), the U.N. envoy on Syria, waits with other delegates before a meeting at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, Dec. 20, 2013.
Lakhdar Brahimi (C), the U.N. envoy on Syria, waits with other delegates before a meeting at the United Nations European headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, Dec. 20, 2013.
VOA News
U.N.-Arab League peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi says 26 nations have been invited to attend a Syria peace conference next month, but that the U.S. has blocked Iran's participation.

Brahimi says the U.S. remains unconvinced that Iran's attendance "would be the right thing to do."

Iran has backed Syria's government in the country's nearly three-year-old conflict.

Brahimi spoke after meeting Friday with U.S. and Russian delegations to determine which nations should be invited to the Syrian peace conference scheduled to open on January 22 in the Swiss city of Montreux.

The conference has been delayed for months due to questions about who should represent the Syrian opposition and government, and which regional powers should be at the table.

The goal of the talks is for the government and opposition to agree on a settlement that includes a transitional authority with full executive powers.

After Friday's meeting, Brahimi also urged Syria's government to halt bomb attacks on civilians and for the Syrian opposition to release all prisoners, including children.  

The meeting came a day after Russia blocked a U.N. Security Council statement that would have condemned Syria's government for recent missile and "barrel bomb" attacks on civilians.

The fighting in Syria has killed more than 100,000 people and has forced millions more from their homes.


Some information was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

You May Like

Video One Year After Thai Coup, No End in Sight for Military Rule

Since carrying out the May 22, 2014 coup, the general has retired from the military but is still firmly in charge More

Goodbye, New York

This is what the fastest-growing big cities in America have in common More

Job-Seeking Bangladeshis Risk Lives to Find Work

The number of Bangladeshi migrants on smugglers’ boats bound for Southeast Asian countries has soared in the past two years More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Sunny Enwerem from: Nigeria
December 22, 2013 8:39 AM
@Godwin....what ever Iran exports will surly come back,the Law of Karma has never been wrong, to rule is never the birth right of any family Assad should give way to change in his country or die with the change,one thing is certain which is his regime's involvement in the death of Hariri's death is hunting them all.

by: Change Iran Now from: USA
December 21, 2013 9:26 PM
The risk of regional war has certainly not decreased, but in fact has escalated rapidly with the Syrian civil war fueled by Iranian fighters, funds and weapons. Deep unrest in Egypt and Israel aided by support and conflict for Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood. Not to mention strife in Iraq and Afghanistan where Iran deeply meddles with Sunni and Shiite conflicts. Iran’s hand is seen in virtually every regional conflict now raging throughout the Mideast, drawing in the West and Russia in a new and disturbing era of proxy wars.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
December 21, 2013 6:46 AM
There should not have been any serious misgiving about Iran's participation in the talks if the was not decisive in its support of Assad rather than the country; if Iran was not working to destroy other countries using certain elements within the region. From every point of view, Syria's crisis is a continuation of the Arab Spring which proved itself to be the worst thing to happen to the region in modern history, as it tends to turn the hand of the clock backward. Now Bashar al Assad, a chip of the old block, a shoot from the past, seemingly a continuation of hereditary oligarchy, proved to be a more preferable option than the so-called opposition (FSA etc.) that is trying to stop the Assad family rule to usher in what some thought was modern democracy. Now that it has been found out that the reverse is the case, should the world (including USA) not also change course to allow Assad transit his regime and found a lasting democracy in the country? After all such other countries like Saudi Arabia, etc. which have been under hereditary leadership for centuries are still subsisting and stable, though lacking certain things - which cannot be exchanged for the crisis in those countries that embraced the Arab Spring like Syria. In all the places where the Arab Spring caused a change of government - Tunisia, Egypt, Libya - it has been one trouble or another, and there is no peace especially for free thinkers, minorities and liberals. The world should not be about to make another mistake just for the sake of change that is unsustainable and retrogressive - just because USA wants change. Iran though has not been a good friend of the region, while its exclusion may not be in the best interest of Assad and the talks, its inclusion is feared for its antisemitic views wherein its leverage with the subsisting regime continues to fuel insurgency through Hamas and Hezbollah thereby destabilizing the region further. If Iran will drop its support of militancy and pursue a greater and wider mission of regional coherence, its future inclusion in peace negotiations and settlements can be meaningful. For now, though it has been touted that though at government level Iran is belligerent to some regional players but its people are docile and amenable to peace with all, but it is the same people that make up the government that antagonize the region. Therefore Iran must first drop the idea of buying cheap popularity with the Arabs, embrace proper diplomatic pursuit to be able to be found worthy to mediate in regional conflicts. It cannot be directly or indirectly involved in conflicts and at the same time be expected to play the role of a mediator. It cannot be the prosecutor and judge at the same time. Think this is the major ground its exclusion becomes justified.

by: Anonymous
December 21, 2013 5:08 AM
There is all sorts of iranians that have been hired by bashar al assad to do his criminal work.

by: Sunny Enwerem from: Nigeria
December 20, 2013 11:46 AM
Here they go again!another year for the jobless diplomats flying up and down wasting time and doing noting knowing very well that noting will happen till Assad's term is over next year but for now they should go and bury their heads in shame for failing to arm the FSA when mostly needed leading to the straighten of the Islamist .
In Response

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
December 21, 2013 6:58 AM
Sunny, FSA is just a name given to an incoherent opposition against Bashar al Assad. The opposition is scattered in their viewpoint and objectives. Now it includes al qaida mostly seeking an islamic republic in Syria. USA should rather throw all its weight behind Assad to return the country to peaceful ways before looking for avenues to make a desired and lasting change for democracy in the country. It cannot because of Iran throw away the baby with the bathwater. Supporting the Opposition and so bring in more terrorists next door to Israel after Hamas and Hezbollah have been there, will extend the war front; that will be very disastrous.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthroughi
X
May 22, 2015 10:23 AM
Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthrough

Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Europe Follows US Lead in Tackling ‘Conflict Minerals’

Metals mined from conflict zones in places like the Democratic Republic of Congo are often sold by warlords to buy weapons. This week European lawmakers voted to force manufacturers to prove that their supply chains are not inadvertently fueling conflicts and human rights abuses. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Class Tackles Questions of Race, Discrimination

Unrest in some U.S. cities is more than just a trending news item at Ladue Middle School in St. Louis, Missouri. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, it’s a focus of a multicultural studies class engaging students in wide-ranging discussions about racial tensions and police aggression.
Video

Video Mind-Controlled Prosthetics Are Getting Closer

Scientists and engineers are making substantial advances towards the ultimate goal in prosthetics – creation of limbs that can be controlled by the wearer’s mind. Thanks to sophisticated sensors capable of picking up the brain’s signals, an amputee in Iceland is literally bringing us one step closer to that goal. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Afghan Economy Sinks As Foreign Troops Depart

As international troops prepare to leave Afghanistan, and many foreign aid groups follow, Afghans are grappling with how the exodus will affect the country's fragile economy. Ayesha Tanzeem reports from the Afghan capital, Kabul.
Video

Video Poverty, Ignorance Force Underage Girls Into Marriage

The recent marriage of a 17-year old Chechen girl to a local police chief who was 30 years older and already had a wife caused an outcry in Russia and beyond. The bride was reportedly forced to marry and her parents were intimidated into giving their consent. The union spotlighted yet again the plight of many underage girls in developing countries. Zlatica Hoke reports poverty, ignorance and fear are behind the practice, especially in Asia and Africa.
Video

Video South Korea Marks Gwangju Uprising Anniversary

South Korea this week marked the 35th anniversary of a protest that turned deadly. The Gwangju Uprising is credited with starting the country’s democratic revolution after it was violently quelled by South Korea’s former military rulers. But as Jason Strother reports, some observers worry that democracy has recently been eroded.
Video

Video California’s Water System Not Created To Handle Current Drought

The drought in California is moving into its fourth year. While the state's governor is mandating a reduction in urban water use, most of the water used in California is for agriculture. But both city dwellers and farmers are feeling the impact of the drought. Some experts say the state’s water system was not created to handle long periods of drought. Elizabeth Lee reports from Ventura County, an agricultural region just northwest of Los Angeles.
Video

Video How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction

An international team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of the woolly mammoth. Led by the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, the work opens the door to recreate the huge herbivore, which last roamed the Earth 4,000 years ago. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble considers the science of de-extinction and its place on the planet
Video

Video Blind Boy Defines His Life with Music

Cole Moran was born blind. He also has cognitive delays and other birth defects. He has to learn everything by ear. Nevertheless, the 12-year-old has had an insatiable love for music since he was born. VOA’s June Soh introduces us to the young phenomenal harmonica player.

VOA Blogs