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US Sending 'Get Tough' Message on Illegal Immigration Surge

US Sending 'Get Tough' Message on Illegal Immigration Surgei
Brian Padden
June 19, 2014 7:46 PM
Conflicting policies may be contributing to the surge of undocumented young people from Central America trying to enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden reports that while immigration authorities say anyone who enters the country illegally -- regardless of their age -- will be deported, U.S. courts and the Obama administration have made exceptions that give many cause for hope.
US Sending 'Get Tough' Message on Illegal Immigration Surge
Brian Padden
Conflicting policies may be contributing to the surge of undocumented young people from Central America trying to enter the United States. While immigration authorities say anyone who enters the country illegally -- regardless of their age -- will be deported, U.S. courts and the Obama administration have made exceptions that give many cause for hope.

In the last year, nearly 50,000 children from Central America have been apprehended at the U.S. border, overwhelming detention facilities. Many say they are fleeing gang violence and poverty.  But they are also motivated by the perception that if underage children make it to the United States they will not be sent home.

Elyn Rivas, herself an undocumented immigrant living in the state of Maryland, recently paid smugglers $6,000 to bring her 15-year-old son Hector Ivan Rivas to the U.S. The boy was detained by the border patrol in Texas, but eventually was released to his mother’s custody until a court hearing is scheduled.

Undocumented immigrants

Rivas said she does not believe U.S. authorities will deport him. “No, I do not think they will send him back. I do not know. I trust they will not send him back, at least that is what I hope. I trust in God.”

Immigration opponents blame Obama’s directive not to deport undocumented immigrants who came as children before 2007 for encouraging this new wave of illegal migration.  

Security analyst Adam Isacson with Washington Office on Latin America recently was in Central America interviewing migrants making their way to the United States, and heard rumors of amnesty.

“We have heard that newspapers and especially smugglers are spreading some story that until the end of this year -- why the end of this year who knows -- there is a special dispensation or a special status or something that will allow women and children to come to the United States," said Isacson

Enforcing deportation

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson recently tried to clarify the U.S. position, saying authorities will deport these young people trying to enter the country illegally.  

"I also wish to make clear that those apprehended at our border are priorities for removal. They are priorities for enforcement of our immigration laws, regardless of age," said Johnson.

But Isacson says U.S. courts also could overrule deportation orders if the children can claim credible fear from gang violence. “It is possible that some of those kids do have a good chance of staying, especially if they can argue they face some danger when they come back," he said.

With 60,000 more undocumented minors expected to cross the border this year, the president is trying to get the word out that deportation laws will be enforced. He also is seeking $160 million in new funds from Congress to assist in swiftly processing the young immigrants.

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by: Katlin from: Oregon
June 19, 2014 9:36 PM
Kick them out of here. It isn't our responsibility to take care of everybody in Mexico that doesn't like their situation. We need to take care of our own citizens first. As long as one American veteran is without needed services, as long as one American senior has to choose between buying food and buying medicine, as long as one American child goes to bed hungry, we have no business spending a cent on lawbreakers. Take them back across the border, seal the border, enforce our laws, and let's take care of our own citizens.

by: Obama_Is_A_TRAITOR from: everywhere
June 19, 2014 8:14 PM
If by "conflicting policies" you mean Emperor Obama's BLATANT REFUSAL to enforce Federal immigration laws in the hopes of winning votes for his own political party, you would be correct.

by: D Dawn from: indiana
June 19, 2014 8:02 PM
It seems yhateveryone is for getting there was two entry was to get into the u ited states. One was thruogh Elias island. My great grandparents came that way in the 18 hundreds. It was very hard one suit case each. They had to speak english get a physiscal, learn are laws, and had to have a profession they had to wait 5 years before become a citzen. And pass a test. And the government needed to see they pay taxes have a business or get send back. These people need to do the same and learn english, read, and write and are laqs. No hand out or get kick out.

by: k bell from: texas
June 19, 2014 7:38 PM
the mother who paid $6,000 to bring her son here needs to be charged with child endangerment then deported for being the worst kind of criminal. child abandonment and endangerment.
U S citizens get charged for just leaving their children alone while they work.

Time for the laws to apply equally. Now that they know where to find the criminal, arrest her, put her in prison then deport her from the jail house doors. The son needs to go back.

Where does a so called poor person get $6000. Most U S citizens don't have that kind of cash. Maybe its because she does pay taxes and scams our welfare system.

by: Aleric from: KY
June 19, 2014 7:18 PM
The US government is sending one message, come here and wait and eventually we will give you a free pass. Then they sign you up to vote and register you as democrat to keep them in power.
In Response

by: taxed enough from: usa
June 20, 2014 9:48 AM
All those kids are "Dreaming" of the path to the 80+ "benefit" programs they will quality for. The "Street Are Paved With Gold" theory. This country should be enforcing the laws and sending the illegals all back to where they came from. Of course the obstructionist Democrats, liberals and progressives are against enforcing the laws of this country.

by: Jason Ciotti from: U.S.
June 19, 2014 5:54 PM
If the U.S. wants to stop illeagle immigration all they have to do is sue these countries in world court for the trillions of dollars spent taking care of there citizens over the past fifty years.then thoses governments will do something to stop it. Right now this is just a good way for thoses countries to get rid of pepole they don't want to take care of!

by: no from: us
June 19, 2014 5:51 PM
The only policy on immigration the U.S. needs is massive and complete deportation of all mezcans and muslims.

by: PoetoftheLight from: Chicago
June 19, 2014 5:19 PM
If only those paid politicians heard the American people as loud as those Wall Street smugs. Maybe just maybe the Old America could be regained.......ok I day dreaming... because no one in the bottom 90% can afford the American dream anymore.

by: soy Americano nacido from: TEXANO
June 19, 2014 4:26 PM
Elyn Rivas paying a smuggler $6000 to commit a crime should also get her deported or at least jail time.

by: Misty123 from: USA
June 19, 2014 4:16 PM
Deport them all Adults and Kids alike!! We cannot handle more illegals in this country!!
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