News / Asia

    US, South Korea to Practice Offense During Joint Exercises

    FILE - South Korean soldiers of an artillery unit take part in an artillery drill with 155mm Towed Howitzers in a previous year's Foal Eagle joint military exercise of the U.S. and South Korea, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ). In the wake of North Korea’s recent nuclear test and long-range rocket launch, Washington and Seoul will focus in part on defending against attacks by weapons of mass destruction during this year’s annual joint exercises.
    FILE - South Korean soldiers of an artillery unit take part in an artillery drill with 155mm Towed Howitzers in a previous year's Foal Eagle joint military exercise of the U.S. and South Korea, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ). In the wake of North Korea’s recent nuclear test and long-range rocket launch, Washington and Seoul will focus in part on defending against attacks by weapons of mass destruction during this year’s annual joint exercises.
    Brian Padden

    The United States and South Korea will reportedly practice preemptive military strikes to take out North Korean nuclear sites next month when they begin the largest joint exercises ever conducted by the two allied forces.

    In the wake of North Korea’s recent nuclear test and long-range rocket launch, Washington and Seoul will focus in part on defending against attacks by weapons of mass destruction during this year’s annual joint exercises.

    In some scenarios being game planned by military strategists, the best defense is a good offense, one that would eliminate a North Korean missile site, nuclear facility or other strategic military target prior to an imminent attack.

    “These types of exercises, this type of training, considering the nature of the threat, it’s going to be the new normal for North Korea, unless they were to roll back their nuclear program, which I don’t foresee that happening anytime soon,” said Northeast Asia security analyst Daniel Pinkston with Troy University in Seoul.

    War games

    This year’s annual U.S., South Korean joint military exercises will start on March 7 and will involve 15,000 American troops, four times more than the 3,700 troops that participated last year, according to South Korea’s Defense Ministry.

    Australia, Canada and a number of other countries that fought with the U.S. during the Korean War from 1950 to 1953 will also likely either participate or send observers.

    The annual joint exercises include the Key Resolve strategic simulation drill, where U.S. and South Korean troops and military assets are deployed to respond to potential North Korean threats, and field exercises called Foal Eagle.

    FILE - South Korean Marine amphibious assault vehicles fire smoke shells to land on the seashore during a joint landing operation by US and South Korean Marines in the southeastern port of Pohang, March 30, 2015.
    FILE - South Korean Marine amphibious assault vehicles fire smoke shells to land on the seashore during a joint landing operation by US and South Korean Marines in the southeastern port of Pohang, March 30, 2015.

    The U.S. has already deployed four F-22 stealth fighters and a nuclear-powered submarine, the USS North Carolina, to South Korea.

    For the joint exercises, the U.S. will bring more aircraft and assets, including the nuclear-powered carrier the USS John C. Stennis.  

    Over 4,500 American troops stationed in Okinawa, along with American V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft and the amphibious transport dock the USS New Orleans will take part in an amphibious landing drill.

    Invasion rehearsal

    North Korea has protested these exercises as rehearsals for invasion, while at the same time conducting its own operational readiness drills.  

    Washington and Seoul in the past have stressed the defensive nature of the exercises to counter criticism from Pyongyang and to ease concerns from Beijing.

    While China opposes North Korea’s nuclear program, it also blames the ongoing U.S. military presence in South Korea for contributing to the tense regional security situation.

    South Korean army soldiers pass by a TV screen showing the live broadcast of South Korean President Park Geun-hye's speech, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016.
    South Korean army soldiers pass by a TV screen showing the live broadcast of South Korean President Park Geun-hye's speech, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016.

    The emphasis on offensive options this year reflects an increased recognition in Washington and Seoul that the North Korean nuclear program presents a growing existential threat that must be addressed, one way or another.

    “When you are brandishing nuclear weapons and you are making declaratory statements such as North Korea does, then you are putting yourself in a dangerous situation in a crisis,” Pinkston said.

    Also on Monday, Seoul’s Defense Ministry announced that U.S. and South Korea will conduct a joint nuclear deterrence drill this week in Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.  The drill is a computer simulation planning exercise against a potential North Korean nuclear threat.

    Peace talks

    The U.S. State Department Monday confirmed reports that officials from Washington and Pyongyang discussed entering into peace treaty talks prior to North Korea’s nuclear test on January 6.

    Washington reportedly expressed an openness to negotiate a formal peace treaty to replace the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War.  The U.S. was willing to compromise its long held position that North Korea halt its nuclear program before any talks could occur, but did insist the nuclear issue to be part of the agenda.  Pyongyang ultimately rejected this offer and proceeded with its fourth nuclear test.

    North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea.
    North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea.

    The United Nations has banned North Korea from developing nuclear weapons and ballistic missile technology and has imposed increasingly stronger rounds of sanctions since 2006.

    Washington recently passed harsh new financial sanctions that could seize the U.S. assets of any company linked to illicit North Korean activities.

    THAAD

    This week, South Korea and the U.S. will begin working level talks on the possible deployment the controversial Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile defense system.

    China and Russia oppose THAAD deployment Korea, saying it can potentially be used against their military forces in the region.

    Seoul had been hesitant to support THAAD to maintain good relations with Beijing its biggest trading partner, but following North Korea’s recent provocations, South Korea has come out in favor of deployment.

    Youmi Kim in Seoul contributed to this report.

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    Comments
         
    by: Mark from: Virginia
    February 22, 2016 8:01 AM
    At no other time of the year does the tension levels rise so dramatically, as does this time of the year when these drills take place. It was called Team Spirit when I participated in 1984.

    North Korea is, and always has been, that rebellious, selfish brother of yours that refuses to obey, no matter how harsh the punishment you threaten him with, and does whatever the hell he wants to do, no matter the consequences. And its not the people who are behaving so badly, its the leadership that does, and the people of North Korea suffer for it.
    I do not see Kim Jung Un losing any sleep, appetite or comfort over the sanctions being imposed, but the people he rules with that fatty fist who are suffering for it.
    In Response

    by: meanbill from: USA
    February 22, 2016 8:42 AM
    Hey Mark _ Why does the US keep threatening North Korea and continues to waste all that tax money on military weapons and maneuvers, when they pose no threat whatsoever for invading the South Koreans or anybody else? .. If you were in the military in South Korea, you'd know that? .. But to reconcile and reunite Korea (with their past history from 1945 thru 1950) would be an almost impossible task that even King Solomon himself with all of his wisdom might find it impossible to do? .. But peace is still possible, if only they held the peace talks without foreign interference? .. think about it?

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