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US Suspends Food Assistance to North Korea

People work in a field outside of Kaesong, North Korea, April 17, 2011. North Korea's perennial food shortage reached a crisis point in 2011, aid workers say, because of torrential rains, the coldest winter in 60 years and rising food prices.
People work in a field outside of Kaesong, North Korea, April 17, 2011. North Korea's perennial food shortage reached a crisis point in 2011, aid workers say, because of torrential rains, the coldest winter in 60 years and rising food prices.

The United States says it has suspended a food aid package to North Korea in response to Pyongyang's plans to carry out a missile launch next month. While the North says its plan to hurl the satellite into space is peaceful, the U.S. and other countries say the launch could help it further its ballistic missile technology.

Peter Lavoy, the acting assistant secretary of defense for Asia and Pacific security affairs, told a congressional hearing the U.S. is working together with allies in the region to try and discourage the North from going ahead with the launch because it would violate Pyongyang's international commitments. He says that failure of North Korea to follow through on what it has promised raises concerns about the nutritional assistance the U.S. has offered as well.

"We have been forced to suspend our activities to provide nutritional assistance to North Korea largely because we have now no confidence that the monitoring mechanisms to ensure that the food assistance goes to the starving people and not the regime elite," Lavoy said.

Late last month, North Korea announced it would temporarily suspend nuclear tests, long-range ballistic missile launches and other nuclear activities. In return, Washington, pledged to provide the North with 240,000 metric tons of nutritional assistance.

The aid package was expected to target the most needy in North Korea - including malnourished young children and pregnant women.

U.S. food aid to the North had been suspended since Pyongyang expelled U.S. food monitors in 2009 after U.S. officials voiced concerns about food distribution.

For now, Pyongyang is resisting calls to cancel the launch, and Lavoy says that violates last month's deal.

"When we recently reached this deal, this did prohibit North Korean missile launches, and we indicated at the time that a satellite missile launch we would interpret as a missile launch because it would use missile technology," Lavoy said,

In addition to the military applications of the launch, there are other concerns as well, Lavoy adds.

"The North Koreans have indicated that they will launch the missile in a southward direction. And I don't know if we have any confidence on the stability of the missile or where the actual impact will be. A number of countries are potentially affected. This could fall on, the debris could fall on their countries. It could cause casualties," Lavoy said.

The U.S. and South Korea say North Korea's two previous launches failed to put satellites into orbit, but Pyongyang insists it succeeded with its last launch in 2009.

Speaking through its state media on Wednesday, North Korea says the satellite launch is intended to estimate crop production and analyze the country's natural resources.

The official KCNA report also quotes an unnamed space program official as saying the North would show the peaceful nature of the satellite by inviting experts and journalists to witness its launch.

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by: Eric
March 28, 2012 5:22 PM
To all the people commenting here beating their chests about how they deserve this, remember who really suffers, the average NK citizen who couldn't care less about weapons or what their nation looks like. Like everyone else they're struggling to feed their families and keep their kids from starving to death.

Their people dream of a better future too and unfortunately they're the ones who really suffer from these "sanctions" not the fat cats at the top.

by: mick
March 28, 2012 4:47 PM
The Americans must be crazy giving food to the North Koreans and they have been doing it for years it achieves nothing and it never has , perhaps they feel good about it and it gives them a warm feeling that they have done the right thing, if they had any brains at all the only thing they should give them is a nuclear bomb delivered by a balistic missile, if they are short of food go ask the Chinese they are the ones who are propping up this regime and have been since the Korean war

by: moomoo
March 28, 2012 4:03 PM
I wish no food aid to North Korea from US, South Korea or Japan...forever !
Communist China must be made accountable for supporting the NK...

by: LeVearne Naylor
March 28, 2012 2:11 PM
I thinks this is gone tp far.Are we going to hiss an spit when North pees in the wrong spot or send up a weather balloon saying it could possible that it has a nucular bomb on board. when other countries send up missles its all right. this is getting out a hand when we dictates other countrys buisnes.

by: John
March 28, 2012 1:27 PM
Wait a moment, we (USA) have been giving North Korea food?! Unreal. Really? That's ridiculous.

by: Dan
March 28, 2012 1:11 PM
Good. Now do the right thing and give the food to the less fortunate in the US. Take care of our own before others.

by: Grammar Nazi
March 28, 2012 1:05 PM
"..the U.S. is working together with allies in the region to try and discourage the North from going ahead with the launch because it would violate Pyongyang's international commitments. "

Why say "to try and discourage".... why not just say "to discourage"? The "try and" part, although common, does not make an sense.

by: Jacques de Goldfiem
March 28, 2012 12:48 PM
North Korea betried the world so many times. The US government is right. See "the North Korea saga" on the website The New Asia Observer at www.asiaobserver.org in North Korea Nuclear saga

by: william
March 28, 2012 12:47 PM
GOOD!!! Don't negotiate with criminals!

by: Neva
March 28, 2012 12:44 PM
Well good. America needs to check out It's own backyard. They need to send food aid the their own starving people first. America is a third world slum.
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