News / Europe

    Death Toll from Brussels Attacks Revised Down to 32

    Belgian soldiers stand guard next to one of the memorials to the victims of the recent Brussels attacks, at the Place de la Bourse in Brussels, March, 27, 2016.
    Belgian soldiers stand guard next to one of the memorials to the victims of the recent Brussels attacks, at the Place de la Bourse in Brussels, March, 27, 2016.

    Belgium authorities said Tuesday that the number of people killed in last week's attacks on the Brussels airport and on a metro station was revised down to 32, excluding the three suicide bombers.

    Officials had previously put the death toll at 35; the error was made by double counting three people with dual citizenship.

    All victims from the twin bombing last Tuesday were identified, and included 17 Belgians and 15 foreigners, said Ine Van Wymersch, a spokeswoman for the Belgian prosecutor's office.

    Authorities also said at least 90 people remain hospitalized, more than 40 of them in intensive care.

    Meanwhile, the United States says more "can and must be done" with regards to boosting intelligence sharing in Europe following last week's deadly terror attacks in Brussels.

    White House spokesman Josh Earnest said the attacks at the Brussels airport and metro are a reminder of how important it is for the "basic fundamentals of intelligence and national security procedures" to be followed.

    Photo released by Belgian federal police on demand of Federal prosecutor shows screengrab of airport CCTV camera showing suspects of this morning's attacks at Brussels Airport, in Zaventem, March 22, 2016.
    Photo released by Belgian federal police on demand of Federal prosecutor shows screengrab of airport CCTV camera showing suspects of this morning's attacks at Brussels Airport, in Zaventem, March 22, 2016.

    He reiterated U.S. support for Belgium during its investigation.

    Belgium's federal prosecutor said Monday that authorities had to release a man widely reported to be a main suspect because there was no justification to hold him. Before his release, the man identified as Faycal C. faced preliminary charges of "taking part in a terrorist group, terrorist murder and attempted terrorist murder."

    Media reports suggested his name was Faycal Cheffou and that he was believed to be the third individual seen in an airport security camera footage alongside the two men who blew themselves up there. 

    It is not clear whether investigators believe he could be the man seen in the grainy CCTV photo, taken moments before the blast.

    Surveillance footage released

    Earlier Monday, police released more airport surveillance footage and asked the public for help in identifying the man, who was wearing a hat and a white jacket.

    All three men in the video were pushing suitcases, believed to be filled with explosives, through the airport departure hall. Two of the men were killed in the blasts. The third man, whose bomb failed to explode, has been the subject of an intense manhunt.

    Ongoing raids

    Authorities have carried out repeated raids in and around the capital, in an attempt to disrupt what appears to be a tight-knit and expansive terrorist network.

    On Monday, Brussels prosecutors charged three people with involvement in a terrorist group. The men charged were identified as Yassine A., Mohamed B. and Aboubaker O. No other details were released, and the prosecutors did not directly say whether the suspects were involved in the Brussels attack.

    You May Like

    US Lawmakers Vow to Continue Immigrant Program for Afghan Interpreters

    Congressional inaction threatens funding for effort which began in 2008 and has allowed more than 20,000 interpreters, their family members to immigrate to US

    Brexit's Impact on Russia Stirs Concern

    Some analysts see Brexit aiding Putin's plans to destabilize European politics; others note that an economically unstable Europe is not in Moscow's interests

    US to Train Cambodian Government on Combating Cybercrime

    Concerns raised over drafting of law, as critics fear cybercrime regulations could be used to restrict freedom of expression and stifle political dissent

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Anonymous
    March 29, 2016 2:16 PM
    The Belgians need shovels more than sympathy. To dig their heads out of the sand. They're under the illusion that if they remain politically neutral and accept every undocumented piece of human garbage into their country, they'll not be targeted by religiously-inspired lunatics rolling in with the rest of the trash. Wake up Belgium and smell the gunpowder.

    by: Marcus Aurelius II from: NJ USA
    March 29, 2016 5:36 AM
    Compared to 9-11 the terrorist attacks on Europe have been pin pricks. Europe has not taken the war on terrorism seriously. In fact they've largely ignored it. They always ignore the threats they create themselves until it's too late. They also fight America when it tries to warn them.

    It may already be too late for Europe. This is one mess the US will not be able to clean up for them. In fact they've made so many mistakes including the undemocratic EU, the failed Euro currency, just to mention two more it seems inevitable to me that Europe is going to crash and burn. And now they may have a new problem. Having relied on American taxpayers to foot the bill for their defense for the last 70 years, at least one Presidential candidate says ENOUGH! Europe start paying your fair share or manage your own defense yourselves.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Baghdad Bikers Defy War with a Roari
    X
    June 28, 2016 10:33 AM
    Baghdad is a city of contradictions. War is a constant. Explosions and kidnappings are part of daily life. But the Iraqi capital remains a thriving city, even if a little beat up. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on how some in Baghdad are defying the stereotype of a nation at war by pursuing a lifestyle known for its iconic symbols of rebellion: motorbikes, leather jackets and roaring engines.
    Video

    Video Baghdad Bikers Defy War with a Roar

    Baghdad is a city of contradictions. War is a constant. Explosions and kidnappings are part of daily life. But the Iraqi capital remains a thriving city, even if a little beat up. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on how some in Baghdad are defying the stereotype of a nation at war by pursuing a lifestyle known for its iconic symbols of rebellion: motorbikes, leather jackets and roaring engines.
    Video

    Video Melting Pot of Immigrants Working to Restore US Capitol Dome

    The American Iron Works company is one of the firms working to renovate the iconic U.S. Capitol Dome. The company employs immigrants of many different cultural and national backgrounds. VOA’s Arman Tarjimanyan has more.
    Video

    Video Testing Bamboo as Building Material

    For thousands of years various species of bamboo - one of the world's most versatile plants - have been used for diverse purposes ranging from food and medicine to textiles and construction. But its use on a large scale is hampered because it's not manufactured to specific standards but grown in the ground. A University of Pittsburgh professor is on track to changing that. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Orphanage in Iraqi City Houses Kids Who Lost their Parents to Attacks by IS

    An orphanage in Iraqi Kurdistan has become home to scores of Yazidi children who lost their parents after Islamic State militants took over Sinjar in Iraq’s Nineveh Province in 2014. Iraqi Kurdish forces backed by the U.S. airstrikes have since recaptured Sinjar but the need for the care provided by the orphanage continues. VOA’s Kawa Omar filed this report narrated by Rob Raffaele.
    Video

    Video Re-Opening Old Wounds in a Bullet-Riddled Cultural Landmark

    A cultural landmark before Lebanon’s civil war transformed it into a nest of snipers, Beirut’s ‘Yellow House’ is once again set to play a crucial role in the city.  Built in a neo-Ottoman style in the 1920s, in September it is set to be re-opened as a ‘memory museum’ - its bullet-riddled walls and bunkered positions overlooking the city’s notorious ‘Green Line’ maintained for posterity. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Brexit Resounds in US Presidential Contest

    Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is resounding in America’s presidential race. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump sees Britain’s move as an affirmation of his campaign’s core messages, while Democrat Hillary Clinton sees the episode as further evidence that Trump is unfit to be president.
    Video

    Video New York Pride March A Celebration of Life, Mourning of Loss

    At this year’s march in New York marking the end of pride week, a record-breaking crowd of LGBT activists and allies marched down Manhattan's Fifth Avenue, in what will be long remembered as a powerful display of solidarity and remembrance for the 49 victims killed two weeks ago in an Orlando gay nightclub.
    Video

    Video NASA Juno Spacecraft, Nearing Jupiter, to Shed Light on Gas Giant

    After a five-year journey, the spacecraft Juno is nearing its destination, the giant planet Jupiter, where it will enter orbit and start sending data back July 4th. As Mike O'Sullivan reports from Pasadena, California, the craft will pierce the veil of Jupiter's dense cloud cover to reveal its mysteries.
    Video

    Video Orlando Shooting Changes Debate on Gun Control

    It’s been nearly two weeks since the largest mass shooting ever in the United States. Despite public calls for tighter gun control laws, Congress is at an impasse. Democratic lawmakers resorted to a 1960s civil rights tactic to portray their frustration. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti explains how the Orlando, Florida shooting is changing the debate.
    Video

    Video Tunisian Fishing Town Searches for Jobs, Local Development Solutions

    As the European Union tries to come to grips with its migrant crisis, some newcomers are leaving voluntarily. But those returning to their home countries face an uncertain future.  Five years after Tunisia's revolution, the tiny North African country is struggling with unrest, soaring unemployment and plummeting growth. From the southern Tunisian fishing town of Zarzis, Lisa Bryant takes a look for VOA at a search for local solutions.
    Video

    Video 'American Troops' in Russia Despite Tensions

    Historic battle re-enactment is a niche hobby with a fair number of adherents in Russia where past military victories are played-up by the Kremlin as a show of national strength. But, one group of World War II re-enactors in Moscow has the rare distinction of choosing to play western ally troops. VOA's Daniel Schearf explains.
    Video

    Video Muslim American Mayor Calls for Tolerance

    Syrian-born Mohamed Khairullah describes himself as "an American mayor who happens to be Muslim." As the three-term mayor of Prospect Park, New Jersey, he believes his town of 6,000 is an example of how ethnicity and religious beliefs should not determine a community's leadership. Ramon Taylor has this report from Prospect Park.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora