News / Africa

US Wants African Troops Deployed in South Sudan

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Linda Thomas-Greenfield, right, shown here at a hearing on Capitol Hill in January 2014, has called for IGAD member states to send troops to South Sudan to help police a ceasefire that has already been violated.
U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Linda Thomas-Greenfield, right, shown here at a hearing on Capitol Hill in January 2014, has called for IGAD member states to send troops to South Sudan to help police a ceasefire that has already been violated.
The United States has called on African countries to send troops to South Sudan to help shore up a shaky peace deal signed last week by President Salva Kiir and his arch rival in the five-month-old conflict, Riek Machar.

The State Department's  Assistant Secretary for African Affairs, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, made the call for African boots on the ground Wednesday during an online question and answer session with callers from around Africa.

"We have to work closely with the leaders in the region to make sure that we get IGAD troops on the ground who will be put in position so that they can monitor the agreement and ensure that anyone who is involved in breaking that agreement will be held responsible,"  said Thomas-Greenfield, who visited Juba two weeks ago with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

The Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) has been trying since January to broker a peace deal between the warring sides in South Sudan.

A cessation of hostilities agreement signed at the end of January called for monitoring and verification teams made up of civilians and "individuals with a military background" to be deployed around the country.

The first team of monitors, who under the terms of the January 23 agreement are unarmed, was deployed at the start of last month, but fighting has continued in spite of their presence.

IGAD member states who provide members of the monitoring and verification teams have asked for a military force to be deployed to protect the monitors.

Troops in South Sudan a top US priority

Deploying the regional protection force "is one of our highest agenda items right now in dealing with South Sudan," Thomas-Greenfield said.

The United States is pushing for a U.N. resolution "that will allow these troops to deploy as quickly as possible," she said.

As Thomas-Greenfield spoke, fighting was reported in several hot spots around South Sudan including Bentiu in Unity State, and parts of Jonglei and Unity states, and the U.N. Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) said medical supplies were looted from hospitals in Bentiu, which is also a violation of the recent peace agreement

The conflict in South Sudan has killed thousands of people and forced more than one million from their homes.

'Famine is looming'

Thomas-Greenfield repeated a warning that has been made frequently in recent weeks by aid agencies, the United Nations, and the United States and European Union, that unless peace is restored quickly in South Sudan, the country faces a massive humanitarian disaster.
"There is a famine that is looming if this fighting does not stop," she said.

For that reason, she said, "We have to work to ensure that the (peace) agreement takes root."

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by: David
May 16, 2014 9:01 AM
A Humanitarian Appeal.

Please US Assistant Secretary of State Linda Thomas Greenfield and John Kerry, visit to Guruve in Zimbabwe, 130 Kms North of Harare, where a farmer and his daughter were attacked on 15 May 2014 and his daughter died. Seeing is believing.

by: Bol from: Bor
May 16, 2014 2:54 AM
What are armed so-called peace keepers coming to do in South Sudan? The criminals in the US are warned time and time again that South Sudanese people do not want any more UN-US mercenaries.

The there is no where in the world were the two heavily armed rivals can be separated by another armed entity except the US twisted world's view, that sending its UN-US mercenaries to other countries in name of peace keeping, while the agenda is far out of the intended purpose.

The current problem in South Sudan doesn't require another UN-US mercenaries. The UN-US current mercenaries of UNIMISS, USAID, OXfam, MSF and some other underground NGOs already have a hand in this war against South Sudanese people.

But hey! What is US to order other sovereign countries to send armed troops to another sovereign country? The US is so out of touch that it thinks that every body else on earth gives a damn about what the US thinks these days?!

Forced those African troops come to South Sudan, but they are not wanted period. Should they heed the US calls, then they are going to be taken as occupiers by the South Sudanese people. South Sudanese even want the current UNIMISS mercenaries out of the country, let alone welcoming another UN-US mercenaries.

The UN-US are playing games with South Sudan and South Sudanese people, but South Sudanese are not going to buy their game of wanting flood our country with their mercenaries in the name of their so-called peace keeping.

These so-called peace keepers are the same ones that create these war to further their stays in the country.

The UN-US must first of all find the willing South Sudanese who would be happy seeing armed foreign criminals in their midst. In my own community though, any damn foreign troops in the name of the so-called UN-US peace keeping will eat bullets, be they Africans or Indians, Pakistanis or Bangaladeshis or Koreans.

Now in Bor they are confined in the base, Should they venture out then, they will be taken back to their home countries in coffins. Enough is Enough is enough with these UN-US peace keepers.

Our people have been living here for ages and they sometimes fight each others and make their own peace without inviting any damn foreign armed criminals to come and keep their peace.

The criminals in the US still think their game behind their so-called peace keeping mission is not yet known!

The US its self is badly blighted with daily gun violent, but other countries are not calling for the peace keepers to be sent to the US to save the US from always killing themselves. Who appointed the US as the world police anyway?

I checked out any trace of a clause in the international law that say, the US is the world's police, but i find absolutely non whatsoever.

The US should just sticks its nose out South Sudan a bit.

by: Lisa from: Tx
May 16, 2014 12:27 AM
Dear US, you have to understand that south sudan is not peaceful country, because of one political system their sending African troop under IGAD is useless because as soon as planting season is done the African troop gone, then the spla will take over and start the killing. Why not spending that money on creating democratic vote for each area so people could elect whom they want as their leader. South sudanese people are sick of spla they don't respect human life, because once if you said againest spla your family will live in fear. Why not call for election instead of spla forming five president they are all spla they are after money and their family. If really the world want to help they should call for open vote. Which spla will not agree .they once say the country belong to spla. Not even Dr riek who help bring peace in the south sudan when he said we should live in peace, he is regarded as outsider who will never be anything in south sudan ask the southern whom do they want as their leader? If you put kiri and riek, they will vote for riek because currently all spla are after money not peace. You better believe me. Stop giving money to IGAD. American you have power to bring peace in that country within a year if not six month. Call for election, send in kenyan MP, Tanzania MP and UN observes in each town. Yes that will work. Let the poor be free. I wish one day Jesus ask obama and Kerry why you did not save my people ?

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