News / Asia

US Warns China on Cyber Security

VOA News
A senior White House official is calling on China to take "serious steps" to stop cybercrimes, saying the issue is a "growing challenge" to U.S.-China relations.

National Security Advisor Tom Donilon on Monday called on China to acknowledge the scope of the problem and engage in talks with the U.S. on acceptable behavior in cyberspace.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said Tuesday that Beijing was open to talks, but insisted that China is a victim, not perpetrator of computer crimes. "What the Internet needs is not war, but rules and cooperation. China is willing, on the basis of the principles of mutual respect and mutual trust, to have constructive dialogue and cooperation on this issue with the international community, including the United States, to maintain the security, openness and peace of the Internet," he stated.

Several large U.S. technology companies, including Apple, Facebook, and Twitter, were hacked earlier this year. The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Washington Post newspapers also say they were attacked by China-based hackers.

Last month, U.S. Internet security group Mandiant accused the Chinese military of stealing large amounts of data from about 150 U.S. companies and organizations.

China's defense ministry denied the charge, saying Mandiant's report lacked proof. It also returned the accusation, saying several Chinese military websites have been attacked by U.S.-based hackers.

U.S. officials have increasingly criticized China-based computer hacking attempts. But they have been less pointed in making direct accusations against the Beijing government, instead hoping to use talks to solve the problem.

Duncan Clark, chairman of technology consultancy BDA, tells VOA  that cautiously raising the issue with Beijing could bring good results.

"I think letting them know that we know [about the hacking] is probably not a bad strategy. But interestingly, this [Mandiant report] wasn't something that came directly form the U.S. government. There has been debate about whether to do this, but it was helpful that this report came from a private sector player, in the sense that there's still some room for maneuvering there," said Clark.

In a speech Monday to the Asia Society in New York, Donilon said Chinese hacking attempts represent not only a national security concern, but also an economic one. He said U.S. businesses are increasingly concerned about "sophisticated, targeted theft of confidential business information."

The U.S. last month unveiled a new strategy to counter hackers and cyber spies, including the use of fines and trade actions against those targeting trade secrets.

Some U.S. lawmakers estimate that American companies lost more than $300 billion last year to trade secret theft, much of it to due to hacking by Chinese cyber spies.

You May Like

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said To Be Improving

Experimental drugs have been tried on six people: three Westerners and now, three African pyhysicians More

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities residents rebuild their lives, but many say everyone is being treated with suspicion More

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

Girls learn to object; FGM practitioners face penalties from jail sentences to stiff fines More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Richard from: Vietnam
March 12, 2013 1:18 PM
China is a type of stealing the inventions of other countries to build their own. This is the fastest solution quickly without removal studies.When caught stealing they always tried to deny whether the evidence is very clear.So the U.S. should teach China a lesson well worth


by: Du Nhau Choi from: Hanoi
March 12, 2013 6:35 AM
Chinese communist robber always robber, they annexed and occupied the land of Tibetans, of Uighurs, now they started to steal other countries' secret files for their evil purpose. Hope the US taught the Chinese one lesson on how to be a good prisoner.

In Response

by: Hoang from: Canada
March 13, 2013 7:46 AM
To Jonathan Huang, a proud chinaman
China have invaded Vietnam many times in history and Vietnam have taught China many lessons. Even with U.S. support in 1979, Vietnamese women and militia gave the PLA a bloody nose when China invaded Vietnam. China invaded Paracel( Hoang Sa) islands in 1974 from South Vietnam at the end of Vietnam war when South Vietnam was weak and did not receive support from U.S. Taiwan also took control of largest Spratly islands from Vietnam in 1974.
China captured Spratly( Truong Sa) islands from Vietnam in 1988 by killing defenceless Vietnamese soldiers.

In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
March 12, 2013 11:34 AM
@Du Nhau Choi from: Hanoi. Hope the US taught the Chinese one lesson on how to invade Communist Vietnam successfully. LOL

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improvingi
X
Carol Pearson
August 19, 2014 11:43 PM
The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improving

The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As the Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities from pro-Russian separatists, residents are getting a chance to rebuild their lives. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the town of Kramatorsk in Donetsk province, where a sense of fear is still in the air, and distrust of the government in Kyiv still runs deep.
Video

Video China Targets Overseas Assets of Corrupt Officials

As China presses forward with its anti-graft effort, authorities are targeting corrupt officials who have sent family members and assets overseas. The efforts have stirred up a debate at home on exactly how many officials take that route and how likely it is they will be caught. Rebecca Valli has this report.
Video

Video Leading The Fight Against Islamic State, Kurds Question Iraqi Future

Western countries including the United States have begun arming the Kurdish Peshmerga forces in northern Iraq to aid their battle against extremist Sunni militants from the Islamic State. But there are concerns that a heavily-armed Kurdistan Regional Government, or KRG, might seek to declare independence and cause the break-up of the Iraqi state. As Henry Ridgwell reports from London, the KRG says it will only seek greater autonomy from Baghdad.
Video

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

In some Kenyan communities, female genital mutilation remains a rite of passage. But activists are pushing back, with education for girls and with threats of punishment those who perform the circumcision. Mohammed Yusuf looks at the practice in the rural eastern community of Tharaka-Nithi.
Video

Video For Obama, Racial Violence is Personal Issue

The racial violence in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is presenting U.S. President Barack Obama with an issue to which he has a deep personal connection. To many Americans, Obama's election as America's first black president marked a turning point in race relations in the United States, and Obama has made ending the violence a policy priority. On Monday he issued a new call for calm and understanding. Luis Ramirez reports from the White House.
Video

Video Clinton-Obama Relationship Could Impact 2016 Election

President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have a long and complicated relationship. That relationship took another turn recently when Clinton criticized the president’s foreign policy. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone reports there is renewed attention on the Clinton-Obama relationship as Hillary Clinton considers running for
Video

Video Iran Looks to Maintain Influence in Baghdad With New Shia PM

Washington and Tehran share the goal of stopping Syrian-based militants in Iraq. But experts say it's Iran, not the United States, that will most influence how the new government in Baghdad approaches internal reforms and the war in Syria. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.

AppleAndroid