News / Europe

US Warns Russia Against Instigating Separatist Tensions in Ukraine

US Warns Russia Against Instigating Separatist Tensions In Ukrainei
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April 08, 2014 4:05 AM
The United States has warned Russia against stirring separatist sentiment in eastern Ukraine, following unrest in several cities in recent days. U.S. officials say there are clear signs that pro-Russian demonstrations were orchestrated from outside. Meanwhile, recent events in Ukraine have emboldened Russian-speaking separatists in Moldova to renew their calls for independence, with a view of joining the Russian Federation. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Zlatica Hoke
The United States has warned Russia against stirring separatist sentiment in eastern Ukraine, following unrest in several cities in recent days. U.S. officials said there are clear signs that pro-Russian demonstrations were orchestrated from outside. Meanwhile, recent events in Ukraine have emboldened Russian-speaking separatists in Moldova to renew their calls for independence, with a view of joining the Russian Federation.
 
Pro-Russian demonstrators in eastern Ukraine and in Moldova are calling for a referendum similar to the one that led to Russia's annexation of Crimea last month. 
 
In the city of Donetsk, rioters stormed the regional government building on Sunday and replaced the Ukrainian flag on the building with a Russian one, while others watched, cheering and chanting "Russia!"
 
Pro-Russian demonstrations also took place in Kharkiv. Emily Belkina, a mother of three, said Russians in Ukraine want autonomy.
 
"This new government came to rule with force, you understand, with guns in their hands and we don't have our representative in the new government," said Belkina.
 
In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said there is strong evidence that some demonstrators were Russian agents paid to stir unrest. She said Secretary of State John Kerry addressed the issue with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.
 
"He called on Russia to publicly disavow the activities of separatists, saboteurs and provocateurs, calling for de-escalation and dialogue, and called on all parties to refrain from agitation in Ukraine,” said Psaki.
 
White House spokesman Jay Carney said Russia continues to increase its pressure on Ukraine. 
 
"We see it in the troops that have massed on the border. We see it in a variety of developments internally within Ukraine, in the regions of the country where there are more ethnic Russians," said Carney.
 
Russia has said it has no intention of moving farther into Ukraine after taking over Crimea, but its actions have raised concern in other former Soviet republics. 
 
Moldova is afraid of losing its Trans-Dniester region, whose Russian-speaking majority fought an independence war in 1992 and is now renewing its calls for independence, with the idea of ultimately joining the Russian Federation.
 
Those opposed to Russian influence in Moldova held a demonstration Sunday outside the Russian embassy in the capital, Chisinau.
 
"We are here to express our resentment against Russian aggression in Moldovan Republic. We do not want the Crimean scenario here.  We want our children to have [a] future,” said one protester.
 
U.S. and European officials will meet in the next 10 days with Russian and Ukrainian officials to discuss how to de-escalate the crisis in Ukraine and discourage Russia from fueling tensions in the region.

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by: AAR from: Global
April 10, 2014 8:57 PM
Crimea, Ukraine Georgia, Balkans, Baltic states, Syria....Russia only understands force and power...to look weak you lose face with them....bells went off when the US and the World and UN let Putin break the laws and re-elect himself when his term was up....power is a dangerous thing....Russia (USSR) is really thousands of ethnic groups under the feet of the White Russians of the west....in a true democracy their stranglehold is broken...Putin knows that....millions of their victims are buried all over Russia...freedom isn't FREE!

by: zaza from: GEORGIA
April 08, 2014 7:00 PM
Russians act like old Mongol invaders, they are brutal And ready to desroy evrything to their way. New plague to the civilized ward. Woe be to Putin's Russia. They had occupied my country Georgia as well.

by: matt from: portland
April 08, 2014 5:00 PM
Ukraine moved out on their own started making poor choices got kicked out of college lost their job and now they're going back home to live with their mother.

by: Not Again from: Canada
April 08, 2014 11:25 AM
If you take a look at history, it will be evident that multi ethnic countries rarely survive economic difficulties. Ukraine is an economic basket case. The best example of the failure, in recent times, in the region, was Yugoslavia; terrible economics, pushed the constituent ethnic groups to see themselves as victims of the other ethnic group(s); a rapid rise in nationalism just pushed the situation into a civil war, with all the evils civil wars bring about.

Ukraine is a multi-ethnic country, with a terrible economic situation and with a multiethnic situation, in which the multiethnicity is not equally distributed; clear discrete concentrations of people, that have very little in common, not even the language, in regions, will make it difficult to keep the country as a unitarian unit. Currently Russia's economy is far better off than the Ukraine's, so naturally the Russian ethnic groups want to join it. The propaganda effort, by Russia, also has stirred the people to join Russia. It is very difficult, probably not possible, to keep people under a rule they do not want/accept under the harsh economic conditions, with no real future, that Ukraine finds itself in.

The issue also arises of the creation of incompatible/un-natural borders by the dastardly empires, in this case the Soviet empire; in which ethnic groupings were arbitrarly split. All these issues are negative wrt the survival of the Soviet created greater Ukraine. Both Russia and the Ukraine are not even ancestral people to these regions. Both Russia and Ukraine started as small city/principality type of states with only a few hundred square Kms around their capitals around the Middle Ages; essentially neither one nor the other can even claim ancestral rights to the land, neither are they direct desendents of the Greek, or the Romans or the Turkic tribes (Tatars) or even the Vikings.

Slavs migrated from the indo Iranian plains over 7 to 10 centuries into Europe. BOTTOM LINE- a democratic and peaceful means need to be adopted to sort out the dstardly border mess created by the Soviet empire in this region. A good model is the Chec/Slovak model; and the state that gets the people/land/redraws the borders in its favour, Russia, needs to pay eg 100-300 Trillion? over 100 yrs in compensation to the state, Ukraine, that loses the territory, a big penalty to be adjudicated to ensure we do not get a rush of border changes....on a global scale.

by: Joseph Effiong from: uyo - nigeria
April 08, 2014 8:24 AM
If russians felt they can't live under Ukrainian authority in Ukrainian land, they should quickly quit Ukraine and go back to russia where they come from. Russians speaking community in Ukraine are foreigners and they should leave the land to Ukrainians for them to live in peace and harmony . If russia is a good nation, Soviet union will still be in existence. A tyrannised nation. USA and EU should stand up for the Ukrainians. But viktor yanukovych will remain a slave in russia. He betrayed the good people of Ukraine .
In Response

by: Irene from: Moscow
April 08, 2014 2:54 PM
You have no right to say about russian nation in such way. Russians and ukranians are one folk, a slavic folk, for me. Actually, USA and EU don`t want to help to Ukraine. That's my opinion.

by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
April 08, 2014 5:50 AM
This is very bad on the Us part,They sit there and watched Hosni Mubarak fall, Gaddafi fall, and now Ukraine put their trust in Mr. Obama hands,we are seeing Ukraine falling too. This situation is making the US to look so weak, Somebody needs to stop Mr. Putin aggression. The people of Ukraine needs to live in peace in their own Country. Those people that called themselves Russians need to go home.
In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
April 08, 2014 9:52 AM
IRENE did say it best in replying to you.. Okay, Russians of southeastern Ukraine will go home, and take "their" homes and land with them... PS; I didn't know they had Irene's in Russia?
In Response

by: Irene from: Moscow
April 08, 2014 6:01 AM
Okay, russians of southeastern Ukraine will go home and take the land with them.

by: Joseph Effiong from: uyo - nigeria
April 08, 2014 4:41 AM
Is russia seeking for peace or war ? As russia is fomenting trouble is Ukraine and other nations , russia will never see peace. Pride as reduce russia to dust. No more Soviet union. Either now or in future, russia will also experience unrest and violence more than what it caused in Ukraine.
In Response

by: Plain Mirror Intl from: Plain Planet - Africa
April 10, 2014 7:44 AM
Joseph Effiong, the Ukrainians are the cause of their problems! It is very unfortunate that they could not learn any lesson from the so called Arab Spring that was mortivated by the so call Western freedom and democracy. They should have asked Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Syria "how are you?". If the Ukrainians do not take time, they would regret like Libya, Egypt, Tunisia and Syria! Blame the Ukrainians!

It is very disappointing that you witnessed how the Nigerians, the Labour Union and the government of Nigeria diffused the most ever pronounced demontration against President Good-Luck Jonathan when he removed fuel subsidy, yet you make these blind comments. The International Media agents were ready to see another historical spring similar to that of the Arabs, unfortunately, Nigeria proved to be growing maturely democratically and in leadershipwise. Ukrain need be blame!

by: Joseph Effiong from: uyo - nigeria
April 08, 2014 4:05 AM
As russia is fuelling problems, violence, unrest and separation in Ukraine and neighbouring nations, God will not let russia have peace and also those that incite, support or taking part in the problems.

by: Anonymous
April 08, 2014 2:50 AM
I don't like to guess but going to anyways... Russian Troops pretending to be civilians...

by: george
April 08, 2014 2:41 AM
If anyone knows how to instigate separatist tensions is US.
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