News / Asia

US, Pakistan, Afghanistan Call on Taliban to Join Reconciliation

Afghan Foreign Minister Zalmai Rassoul, left, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar shake hands before a Core Group Ministerial Meeting in Tokyo, Japan, July 8, 2012.
Afghan Foreign Minister Zalmai Rassoul, left, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Pakistani Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar shake hands before a Core Group Ministerial Meeting in Tokyo, Japan, July 8, 2012.
TOKYO, Japan — Foreign ministers from the United States, Afghanistan, and Pakistan met Sunday on the sidelines of an Afghan donor conference in Japan to discuss cross-border cooperation and security.  They called on Taliban fighters to join Afghan reconciliation efforts.

In a joint statement following their talks, Afghan Foreign Minister Zalmai Rassoul, Pakistan Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar, and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said al-Qaida's core leadership in the region has been decimated, reducing the threat to peace and security that led the international community to intervene in Afghanistan in 2001.

They are backing an inclusive Afghan reconciliation process "through which individuals and groups break ties with international terrorism, renounce violence, and abide by Afghanistan's constitution" because they say that is the surest way to lasting security for Afghanistan and the broader region.

Some of the Taliban attacks in Afghanistan are staged from Pakistan, and U.S. officials say they do not believe Pakistan is doing everything it can to prevent those attacks, especially raids carried out by the Haqqani network.

Senior Obama administration officials say Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Khar discussed the Haqqani network in separate talks before the trilateral meeting. It was the first meeting for the two foreign ministers since Pakistan reopened NATO supply lines to Afghanistan that were closed following the killing of 24 Pakistani troops by NATO forces in November.

That route was reopened after Secretary Clinton Tuesday offered her "sincere condolences to the families of the Pakistani soldiers who lost their lives" saying she and Foreign Minister Khar acknowledged the mistakes that led to the attack in the border town of Salala.

Speaking to reporters in Tokyo Sunday, Secretary Clinton says the two countries are moving on.

"We are both encouraged that we've been able to put the recent difficulties behind us so that we can focus on the many challenges still ahead of us, and we want to use the positive momentum generated by our recent agreement to take tangible, visible steps on our many shared core interests," she said.

She says first and foremost is defeating terrorists who threaten Afghan and Pakistani stability as well as the interests of the United States.

"I've said many times that this is a challenging but essential relationship," said Clinton.  "It remains so. And I have no reason to believe it will not continue to raise hard questions for us both."

U.S. officials say there is now the opportunity to get back to closer counter-insurgency cooperation with Pakistan now that the Afghan border is again open to NATO supplies.

You May Like

Ebola Death Toll Nears 5,000 as Virus Advances

West Africa bears heaviest burden; Mali toddler’s death raises new fears More

Jordan’s Battle With Islamic State Militants Carries Domestic Risks

Despite Western concerns that IS militants are preparing a Jordanian offensive, analysts call the kingdom's solid intel a strong deterrent More

Asian-Americans Assume Office in Record Numbers

Steadily deepening engagement in local politics pays off for politicians like Chinese-American Judy Chu More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: mike from: use
July 10, 2012 1:46 AM
That Paki foreign minister had better be careful, if her beauty sexually arouses the Taliban, they will shoot her in the head.


by: John from: Accra
July 09, 2012 6:29 AM
I thought i read somewhere that America NEVER negotiates with TERRORISTS? We live in a strange world of double standards.


by: Halo from: NY
July 08, 2012 10:38 AM
Just wait and see how West will use both these countries against, China, Iran and India...

In Response

by: Kamran Ali from: Pakistan
July 09, 2012 4:04 AM
I completely agree with Halo , that West as whole is vibrant at the moment ,to contain countries with burgeoning economic prospects in the region. Another finding that i would like to share with my friends is that Afghanistan has not yet become free to be independent in pursuing the policy her people want. After decades of incessant war Afghan puppet government has given to Indian plan to bleed Pakistan , Indian 200 embassies along the Durand line, and and modern weapon given to TEHRIK E TALIBAN, and the recurring attacks on Pakistani check posts by terrorists .....that all guarantee another standoff between Pakistan and Afghanistan at the instigation of India.


by: Steve from: USA
July 08, 2012 10:29 AM
What happens to the US policy of not negotiating with the terrorists? Is it because Obama is a Muslim?

What agreements will be made with Taliban, that kafirs can be forcible converted or killed per Islam/Koran?
or it is okay to do jihad against the kafirs?

Please help in finding any sense in this if you are a freedom lover.



by: Anonymous
July 08, 2012 9:50 AM
America is the problem. They refused to provide any evidence on Osama to the Taliban government when requested. Reconciliation can only begin after the US/NATO completely withdraw and pay huge reparations to the Taliban and the Afghan people.


by: Popsiq from: Canada
July 08, 2012 9:48 AM
What's changed but the rhetoric?

There is abosolutely nothing new in the immediate future of Afghanistan. Least of all anything that would encourage the Taliban to want to be part of the US 'solution' to the problem. Their position - in brief, un-invade Afghanistan you're not in the peace profile - is no less valid than the 'world' restatement of 'wanting to rebuild Afghanistan' that was made 13 years ago as preface to a regime change.

Now there is just more of Afghanstan to rebuild, with the resources and good will that were there in 2001 now wasted on 13 years of world-class war fighting.

And is that, now, going to stop? No siree! It will just be a leaner, meaner fighting machine - with oodles of tactical air support- helping the Afghans find the bad guys to kill.

$60 billion a year insurgencies, especially unfinished ones, just don't drop to $ 0 with a declaration of peace. So any relief for American tax debtors is at least another decade down the road.

The only good news seems to be that the suckers have taken the bait again. Let's see if they cough up the moolah.


by: Jen
July 08, 2012 9:43 AM
The Afghan guy looks less than thrilled to be shaking hands with two women.


by: heshukui from: china
July 08, 2012 9:20 AM
Good!


by: Colin Wellstead from: Sydney
July 08, 2012 9:02 AM
Looks like the usual suspects are up to their tricks again. The real criminals run free and dine on caviar.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
October 25, 2014 4:21 PM
Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukraine

Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Smugglers Offer Cheap Passage From Turkey to Syria

Smugglers in Turkey offer a relatively cheap passage across the border into Syria. Ankara has stepped up efforts to stem the flow of foreign fighters who want to join Islamic State militants fighting for control of the Syrian border city of Kobani. But porous borders and border guards who can be bribed make illegal border crossings quite easy. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video Comanche Chief Quanah Parker’s Century-Old House Falling Apart

One of the most fascinating people in U.S. history was Quanah Parker, the last chief of the American Indian tribe, the Comanche. He was the son of a Comanche warrior and a white woman who had been captured by the Indians. Parker was a fierce warrior until 1875 when he led his people to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and took on a new, peaceful life. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Cache, Oklahoma, Quanah’s image remains strong among his people, but part of his heritage is in danger of disappearing.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.
Video

Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Ebola Orphanage Opens in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. Adam Bailes reports for VOA about a new interim care center that's aimed at helping the growing number of children affected by Ebola.

All About America

AppleAndroid