News / Asia

    Philippines, Vietnam Leaders Meet, Take a Swipe at China

    Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, right, shakes hands with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung after their joint press statement at the Malacanang Presidential Palace in Manila, Philippines, May 21, 2014.
    Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, right, shakes hands with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung after their joint press statement at the Malacanang Presidential Palace in Manila, Philippines, May 21, 2014.
    Simone Orendain
    Vietnam’s prime minister held talks with the Philippines president on Wednesday in Manila.  They discussed strengthening defense ties and maritime cooperation.  But the prime minister drew attention over his tough words for China, saying both Manila and Hanoi are determined to oppose what he says are Beijing’s territorial violations in the South China Sea.

    Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung arrived in Manila following high tension with Beijing over a Chinese oil rig that Vietnam says is in its territorial waters.
     
    The Philippines has also complained of run-ins with China’s government surveillance vessels at various disputed outcroppings.  Last month the Philippines protested what it says is a Chinese reclamation project at a reef it claims in the Spratly Islands.
     
    Speaking through an interpreter at the Philippines’ presidential palace, Dung said Manila and Hanoi share the same view of the situation.
     
    “The two sides are determined to oppose China’s violations and called on countries and the international community to continue strongly condemning China and demanding China to immediately end its above said violations and fully, strictly, observe international law,” he said.
     
    During meetings Wednesday the leaders said they are interested in advancing cooperation in defense matters and plan to consult each other more actively when it comes to regional security.
     
    Vietnamese and Chinese ships exchanged water-cannon fire earlier this month after the oil rig started its drilling project.  The incident led to anti-China protests in Vietnam and numerous Chinese companies were vandalized.  Vietnam officials said over the weekend they would clamp down on the protests.
     
    Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia have claims in the South China Sea.  China and Taiwan claim practically the entire sea, which is a well-used trade route, has abundant sea life and is believed to have major oil and gas reserves.
     
    The Philippines in March submitted about 4,000 pages of supporting materials for its international arbitration case over what it calls China’s “excessive claims” in the sea.  China rejects the case and has not responded.
     
    Among the claimants, the Philippines and Vietnam have been the most outspoken against China’s stepped up assertion of its claims in the sea.
     
    President Aquino said the two countries were looking into the “prerequisite” requirements toward forming a strategic partnership.
     
    “I believe that continued cooperation with Vietnam as well as other members of ASEAN in defense and security will only contribute to promoting regional stability.  It is not an overstatement when I say that I look forward to increased collaboration between our respective defense agencies,” he said.
     
    Prime Minister Dung is scheduled to speak at the World Economic Forum on East Asia being hosted by the Philippines over the next two days.  China did not send a delegation to the event.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Mark from: Los Angeles
    May 24, 2014 2:59 PM
    I agree with the Philippines submitting its case to the World Court. But as a petitioner for justice I should also examine myself that I am not equally as guilty as my adversary in the oppression or denial of justice of the poorest of my citizens. I am sure that the Judge of the World will not judge favorably on the favor of a government which violates its citizen's human rights as the Philippine government is guilty of. Hopefully the government will change and will do more to help provide and respect the human rights of its very poor.

    by: fred from: usa
    May 23, 2014 11:16 PM
    we finally found a new pirate of the sea. this country can rob and steal other nation land during a daylight. you don't have to go to Africa to find pirate all you have to go to China. the funny thing is no other countries do anything about it....

    by: Mama Dukes from: Silicon Valley
    May 23, 2014 5:15 PM
    to China there are no such thing as International laws, sovereignty, ethical, and code of conducts. They are all about Chinese and occupied lands. The more lands and world resources they can invade, steal, and consume...the better for them. They seek to outgrow and outlive all the other races and species on Planet Earth. They are the shame and embarrassment of modern mankind.

    by: Adam9 from: Dong Nai, VN
    May 22, 2014 8:13 AM
    They are smiling mischievously and comparing notes, and: -you know good lawyers?
    -yeah, you want? ok, ok, I 'll get you names. -thank you, thank you !!

    by: doan from: hanoi
    May 22, 2014 4:15 AM
    once up on the time China thief two islands of VietNam , now they wants East Sea of Vietnam

    by: Hovhannes from: Montevideo
    May 21, 2014 7:52 PM
    Threats and tough words for China are no use. The Chinese are a people with a keen intellect, and should be dealth with in kind.

    by: SEATO
    May 21, 2014 2:49 PM
    ASEAN countries should use NATO and EU as a model for turning their organisation into a common economic community with a joint military defence,so that they can have more bargaining power when negotiating with China on regional issues.China can carrying on using threats,but if you all stick together and work closely with America,Japan and India,China won't get far.Just forget about all the promises of peaceful negotiation,stability and prosperity from Mr Xi Jinping.They are all lies and make-belief, and don't let China take you by surprise.Peace is only achievable if China respects international laws and renounces all their absurd and unreasonable territorial claims.As for Mr Nguyen Tan Dung,China has never been Vietnam's friend,and never will be.Any more concession to China would make you a national traitor.So I hope you would take the best course to defend Vietnam's sovereignty and territorial integrity
    In Response

    by: Temujin from: SD
    May 21, 2014 7:15 PM
    China won't back from its illegal claims, unless some ASEAN nations be arm with nukes and long range missiles capable hitting anywhere in china. Like Mao often said "diplomacy through the barrel of the guns, in this case through nukes". That is the only option to deter and contain any chinese future aggression.
    In Response

    by: Jim Smith from: Undisclosed
    May 21, 2014 7:09 PM
    Exactly. An alliance of Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines, and India would be more capable to deal with expanionist regimes like China that seek to absorb all of Asia (or all of the world). Their mobile national boundaries are ever-expanding, and this is a terrible cancer on the earth.

    by: Freedom4All from: US
    May 21, 2014 11:42 AM
    Way to go VN-Phil. China intention is clear like day light. Sooner or after, China will go after Brunei and Malaysia shoreline to reinforce China claim.

    Better yet, ASEAN or individual countries in dispute should work together to resolve all disputes among yourself through negotiation. This will help to create a foundation for trust, unity and cooperation and probably, and also to teach China on how to negotiate - Respect sovereignty.
    In Response

    by: Temujin from: SD
    May 21, 2014 6:50 PM
    China is already claim Brunei and Malaysia territorial waters up to 12 nautical miles from mainland. China is eyeing on those Natuna islands and its resources from Indonesia. If ASEAN do not united, than they will lose it all. Cambodia will be spare? not a chance!

    by: abel ogah from: nigeria
    May 21, 2014 11:02 AM
    No one nation should intimidate others because of their military might.
    In Response

    by: Anonymous from: Reno
    May 21, 2014 1:34 PM
    China and Russia have just made a major agreement on energy. That is what the world sees above the table. The real discussion and agreements are hidden under that table. These nations are dangerous alone and when they cooperate with each other the world must stand together against their aggressive behaviors.

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