News / Asia

Two on Missing Malaysia Flight Had Stolen Passports

Families Wait for Word on Vanished Malaysia Flighti
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William Ide
March 08, 2014 5:43 PM
Vietnamese rescue planes searching for a missing Malaysia Airlines jet spotted two large oil slicks in the area where the aircraft vanished. VOA's Bill Ide has the latest from Beijing, where passengers' relatives gathered. ((NARRATOR))

VIDEO: VOA's Bill Ide has the latest from Beijing, where passengers' relatives gathered in hopes of learning more about the fates of their loved ones.

VOA News
Officials say two passengers on the missing Malaysia Airlines jet were traveling with stolen passports.

Two men listed on the flight's manifesto — one from Italy and another from Austria — never boarded the flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing that disappeared early Saturday carrying 239 people. Both men had their passports stolen in Thailand in the last two years. It is not clear who was flying with the stolen documents.

The Austrian is in his home country and the Italian is still living in Thailand.

U.S. officials say they are still looking at the disappearance as if it is an accident, but Malaysian officials say they are not ruling anything out.

The Vietnamese government sent rescue boats where search planes spotted two large oil slicks off the southern tip of the country shortly after the airliner vanished on Saturday.

The slicks — each about 15 kilometers long — are the first potential traces found since Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing disappeared early with 239 passengers and crew on board.

The Pentagon has dispatched a naval destroyer and a surveillance plane to aid in the search, and ships and aircraft from Malaysia, Vietnam, China and the Philippines have concentrated their search in an area about 240 kilometers off the coast of Vietnam's southwestern Tho Chu island. Vietnamese authorities say that is where they last detected a signal from the Boeing 777-200.

"The search and rescue operations will continue as long as necessary," Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak told reporters in Kuala Lumpur. He said 15 air force aircraft, six navy ships and three coast guard vessels had been pressed into service by Malaysia.

A Vietnamese naval commander had told state media that the missing plane could have crashed in Malaysian waters.

This screengrab from flightradar24.com shows the last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, Mar. 7, 2014.This screengrab from flightradar24.com shows the last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, Mar. 7, 2014.
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This screengrab from flightradar24.com shows the last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, Mar. 7, 2014.
This screengrab from flightradar24.com shows the last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370, Mar. 7, 2014.
However, Malaysian acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Tun Hussein told a news conference that he had not been informed that the plane had been located and no wreckage has been sighted.

"We are doing everything in our power to locate the plane. We are doing everything we can to ensure every possible angle has been addressed," Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein told reporters near the Kuala Lumpur International Airport.

"We are looking for accurate information from the Malaysian military. They are waiting for information from the Vietnamese side," he said.

Vanished after reaching 35,000 feet

The airline said it lost all contact with Flight MH370 about an hour after it took off from the Malaysian capital early Saturday morning local time.

Malaysian Airlines Group Chief Executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahyain, right, speaks during a press conference at a hotel in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Mar. 8, 2014.Malaysian Airlines Group Chief Executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahyain, right, speaks during a press conference at a hotel in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Mar. 8, 2014.
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Malaysian Airlines Group Chief Executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahyain, right, speaks during a press conference at a hotel in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Mar. 8, 2014.
Malaysian Airlines Group Chief Executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahyain, right, speaks during a press conference at a hotel in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Mar. 8, 2014.
Flight MH370 last had contact with air traffic controllers 120 nautical miles off the east coast of the Malaysian town of Kota Bharu, Malaysia Airlines chief executive Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said in a statement.

At a news conference Saturday, he said the airline was working with search and rescue teams to locate the aircraft and was calling the families of the passengers and crew.

The company's Facebook page said people from 14 nationalities were among the 227 passengers, including at least at least 152 Chinese, 38 Malaysians, seven Indonesians, six Australians, five Indians and four French. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said three Americans were on board the flight.

"The Australian government fears the worst for those aboard missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370," a spokeswoman for Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said.

Flight tracking website flightaware.com showed the plane flew northeast over Malaysia after takeoff and climbed to an altitude of 35,000 feet. The flight vanished from the website's tracking records a minute later while it was still climbing.

China's official Xinhua news agency said contact with the plane was lost in Vietnamese airspace. It said the plane never entered China's air traffic control area.  Vietnamese officials said the flight disappeared about a minute short of entering Vietnamese airspace. 

  • A relative of Norliakmar Hamid and Razahan Zamani, passengers on a missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200 plane, cries at their house in Kuala Lumpur.
  • A man takes pictures of a flight information board displaying the Scheduled Time of Arrival (STA) of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 (top, in red) at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China, Mar. 8, 2014.
  • A relative of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries, surrounded by journalists, at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China.
  • This screengrab from flightradar24.com shows the last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.
  • In this photo released by the Armed Forces of the Philippines, Western Command PIO, Filipino government troopers look at a map as they continue the search for the missing plane of Malaysian Airlines at Antonio Bautista Air Base in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan province.
  • Family members of those onboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight walk into the waiting area at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang.
  • Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, center, arrives at the reception center and holding area for family and friend of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur.
  • A family member of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane is mobbed by journalists at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, outside Kuala Lumpur.
  • A relative of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 cries as she talks on her mobile phone at the Beijing Capital International Airport, China.
  • A spokesperson, right, from the Malaysia Airlines speaks to the media during a news conference at a hotel in Beijing, China. Search teams across Southeast Asia scrambled to find a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 239 people on board that disappeared from air traffic control screens over waters between Malaysia and Vietnam early morning.

'Extremely worried'

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told reporters in Beijing that China was "extremely worried" about the fate of the plane and those on board.

Chinese relatives of passengers angrily accused the airline of keeping them in the dark, while state media criticised the carrier's poor response.

"There's no one from the company here, we can't find a single person. They've just shut us in this room and told us to wait," said one middle-aged man at a hotel near Beijing airport where the relatives were taken.

In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Airlines told passengers' next of kin to come to the international airport with their passports to prepare to fly to the crash site, which has still not been identified.

About 20-30 families were being kept in a holding room at the airport, where they were being guarded by security officials and kept away from reporters.

The flight left Kuala Lumpur around 12:40 a.m. (1640 GMT Friday) and was due to land in the Chinese capital at 6:30 a.m. (2230 GMT Friday) the same day.

Malaysia Airlines has one of the best safety records among full-service carriers in the Asia-Pacific region.

It identified the pilot of MH370 as Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, a 53-year-old Malaysian who joined the carrier in 1981 and has 18,365 hours of flight experience.

Chinese state media said 24 Chinese artists and family members, who were in Kuala Lumpur for an art exchange programme, were aboard. The Sichuan provincial government said Zhang Jinquan, a well-known calligrapher, was on the flight.

If it is confirmed that the plane crashed, the loss would mark the second fatal accident involving a Boeing 777 in less than a year and by far the worst since the jet entered service in 1995.

The most recent accident involving a Boeing 777 was the Asiana Airlines crash at the San Francisco International Airport in July, 2013, in which three people died.  Pilot error is suspected in that incident.

Boeing said it was monitoring the situation but had no further comment. The flight was operating as a China Southern Airlines codeshare.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and AFP and Reuters.

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Comments page of 2
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by: Kunta from: Sinagpore
March 10, 2014 1:22 AM
http://my.news.yahoo.com/blogs/bull-bashing/want-know-killed-altantuya-153157044.html

With new investigations, the layman thinks, we might be able to answer the questions of who instructed the two commandos to kill Altantuya; how they managed to obtain the C4 explosives; what Musa Safri’s role was; who instructed the Immigration Department to expunge all records of Altantuya’s entry into Malaysia; what Najib Razak meant when he allegedly SMSed Razak Baginda: “I am seeing IGP [Inspector-General of Police] at 11.00am. Today … matter will be solved … be cool.”

A case few years back which involved a Mongolian supermodel
Altantuya records of her entry to Malaysia was missing which ended the case which also involves PM - Najib.


by: mrbigg from: us
March 09, 2014 12:47 AM
Pray for MH370, God bless them, hope they safety, newest about Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: http://adf.ly/epkqG


by: Bob smith
March 09, 2014 12:05 AM
The incompetence of US 'intelligence' is once again breathtaking.

They intrude on the privacy of most of the world by listening in to our private phone calls and emails and we are subjected to mindless and ineffective searches at airports.....yet people are able to board flights with stolen or forged passports because there is clearly no effective checking mechanism.

Travelling on a stolen passport certainly doesn't mean you are involved in terrorism but it might suggest to anyone with an IQ slightly above the selection criteria for US intelligence that you are probably up to no good.


by: David K from: Australia
March 08, 2014 9:46 PM
How is it even possible for stolen passports to pass checks? Surely passports are verified against and authoritative international database? If not - this is outrageously dangerous for all travellers. 2 on one plane - is that a pure coincidence?

In Response

by: Ferena from: Singapore
March 09, 2014 9:36 AM
Totally agree with ya. It just once showing us their weak security check and I don't think is coincidence cause both passports were reported lost from Thailand... If there's anything about the airplane mechanism error I think they still have plenty of time to call for Mayday. In this case. Is totally "gone" Hmm... ??? But I still hoping for some survivors out there... Although chances very low ... :(


by: Rick S. from: San Bernardino, CA
March 08, 2014 7:49 PM
It is highly likely that terrorism is the culprit here considering the safety record of the 777 !

That said this " Islamophobia" thing that comes up when ever people mention Islamic terrorism is a bunch of crap !!

Islamists get a kick when murdering innocent women, children and men who are unarmed and unaware of what is about to happen !

Until muslims around the world speak out with one load voice condemning it then it is assumed that they all condone it !

"If the shoe fits, wear it and if it doesn't then speak up because we're all waiting...

In Response

by: Joseph from: Seattle
March 08, 2014 9:58 PM
I agree. This smells like a muslim act of ignorant cowardace.

In Response

by: ihatemullahs
March 08, 2014 9:13 PM
Being American you probably do not know Malaysia is a majority Muslim country.
You really need to read English language newspapers from Muslim countries. Maybe you will get a feel for what most Muslims are saying.


by: Capt.Lin from: China
March 08, 2014 7:25 PM
Let us pray for the missing plane and passengers on board, if it is testified as a Islamic Terrorist Attack eventually, what we going to response...


by: Khawar Nehal from: Dubai
March 08, 2014 5:16 PM
Pray for the missing passengers.

In Response

by: josh from: taiwan
March 08, 2014 7:48 PM
Pray? To what/whom? Myself?
OogaBooga WallaWalla BingBong!
Did I do it right? Did my prayer just work? Did anyone come back to life?


by: Dr Masta Marina from: Finland
March 08, 2014 3:47 PM
this is Islamic terrorist act. and the response to this cowardly act should be global - do not let the Al Jazeeras and the BBC of this world to white wash this. There are way too many Arab in Finland. This requires a governmental act of mass deportation.

In Response

by: ihatemullahs
March 08, 2014 8:41 PM
Dr Masta Marina you are an idiot.
No one knows what caused the crash at this time. Malaysia is a predominantly Muslim country. An idiot like you probably does not know that.
There are over 200 dead souls from many faiths and I would like to send my condolences to their families. This what decent people do regardless of their religion.

In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
March 08, 2014 6:06 PM
up to the present time, there is no determination that missing air plane is a result of terrorist act. I do agree with you that so many Muslim American citizen are actively support terrorist organization .they supported them whether by money or them selves are involve in terrorist act such as the major doctor who killed many soldiers. .the fact that the Gov. can not violated their right without evidence and they are very smart to conceal their real loyalty. And there no litmus test to identify them .it is a real problem and we hope that law enforcement agency can identify them and deported them

In Response

by: Farah from: X
March 08, 2014 5:25 PM
Dr Masta Marina, whatever is in the content of internet reports are all possible theories. However, this comment of yours is very judgemental and unfair as nobody has yet to find the missing plane, let alone discovering the true cause why it vanished! You should read more than your daily newspapers or any news source which have cause Islamophobia abd have a balanced thought on whatever happening in this world. Please remove your irresponsible comment with respect to the grieving families of the crews and passengers of the missing MH370 flight.

In Response

by: jaja from: philippines
March 08, 2014 5:20 PM
How quick to point fingers, dude. The world is brighter because of people like you.


by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
March 08, 2014 1:07 PM
My heart goes with my country folks!
If it's a terrorist attack, I demand China to severely punish those perpetrators.

In Response

by: Q from: China
March 09, 2014 7:12 AM
China creates flourishment there but not poverty or something like that. Have you ever been there? I did. Certain associations are prompting terriorism and damaging development there and several countries are on their side for obvious reasons. Things good for them are certainly not in favor of China. Do they even care the ordinary people in opponent country? Ridiculous.

In Response

by: Aybek from: London
March 08, 2014 6:50 PM
It is too early to say this is a terrorist attack. Even if you invite people from Mars to punish terrorists, it would not work.Moreover, I want to stress one point that the roots of the terrorism is poverty and oppression that China has created in Xinjiang and Tibet.

More and more Uyghur and Tibetans are marginalized from mainstream Chinese society and this is very dangerous. This will only generates extremists than nothing else. China must respect minority right and give them political freedom.


by: khat born from: korea sout
March 08, 2014 10:23 AM
For me very very so said...

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