News / Middle East

Egyptian Army Defends Shooting of Pro-Morsi Protesters

Video of Muslim Brotherhood supporters and military backersi
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July 08, 2013 3:02 PM
Egypt's military and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi are waging a war of words, blaming each other for a clash that killed at least 51 people and injured hundreds of others.

Video of Muslim Brotherhood supporters and pro-military activists

Edward Yeranian
Shootings in front of a military facility Monday in Cairo have left dozens of people dead and dozens more wounded, according to an Egyptian health ministry official.  Reports about who ignited the shoot-out are conflicting, with Muslim Brotherhood supporters accusing the army, and army officials insisting it was a “terrorist attack.” 

Witnesses said the shootings began just before the end of dawn prayers Monday.  The Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators and the Egyptian Army each accused the other side of starting the violence.

The Health Ministry said Monday at least 51 people were killed and hundreds more wounded in the early flare-up near Republican Guard headquarters.  Military officials said one soldier was among the dead and several more were in critical condition.

Pro-Muslim Brotherhood doctors at a field clinic held a news conference in which they claimed the army had used excessive force. Clinic doctors said they treated more than 400 serious wounds, including 150 gunshot wounds.

Al-Jazeera television showed amateur video of a half dozen people it said were peaceful protesters shot by the army.  Egyptian state TV also showed video of assailants pelting soldiers with stones and chunks of concrete as gunshots are heard in the background.

  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi perform weekly Friday prayers at the Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo where they are camping, July 12, 2013.
  • A supporter of Morsi is doused with water on a hot day in Cairo, July 12, 2013.
  • Supporters of the ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout anti-army slogans during a sit-in protest in Cairo July 11, 2013.
  • Morsi Supporters pray after breaking their fast during Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 11, 2013.
  • An Egyptian boy stands among Morsi supporters who are offering the Tarawih prayer after the evening meal during Ramadan, in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi during a rally in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi protest at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted President Mohamed Morsi joins in a protest at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 10, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi reads the Koran at the Rabaa Adawiya square, Cairo,  July 9, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi at their camp in Rabaa Adawiy square, Cairo, July 9, 2013. 
  • A supporter of ousted President Mohamed Morsi with a national flag gestures to army soldiers guard at the Republican Guard building in Nasr City, Cairo, July 9, 2013.
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of Morsi at Republican Guard headquarters in Nasr City, Cairo, July 8, 2013. 
  • Supporters Morsi carry the body of a fellow supporter killed by violence outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Morsi supporters mourn protesters who died during clashes with army soldiers in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Wounded supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi wait for treatment at a field hospital in Cairo, July 8, 2013. 

Muslim Brotherhood spokesmen called the shootings a “massacre,” while an army statement insisted a “terrorist attack” had taken place.

An injured Egyptian soldier, Mohamad Ibraheem described what he experienced.

He said he and other soldiers were there to ensure the safety of the people, but came under attack with gunfire, firebombs and bricks.  He said many of his colleagues were hit.

It was not immediately possible to reconcile the conflicting accounts.

Egyptian interim President Adly Mansour was reported to have appointed a judicial committee to investigate Monday's shootings.  A presidential statement expressed “deep regret” for the violence, but went on to say the shootings took place during an attempt to storm Republican Guard headquarters.

Amid the accusations, Al-Arabiya TV showed a video of Islamist cleric Safwat Hijazi, who supports ousted President Mohamed Morsi, insisting that “all means” would be used to “free Mr. Morsi” from army custody.

Republican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, EgyptRepublican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, Egypt
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Republican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, Egypt
Republican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, Egypt
During the February 2011 revolution which toppled veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak, Islamist militants freed Morsi and other top Muslim Brotherhood leaders from a Sinai prison, and attacked other Egyptian prisons as well.

As reports of Monday's shootings spread, several Islamist groups announced they would not participate in an interim government that was being formed by Mansour.  The Salafi Nour Party called for President Morsi to be reinstated, as did Islamist leader and former presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Aboul Foutouh.

A statement by the Muslim Brotherhood called for Egyptians to “rebel against those who stole their revolution from them.”  Thousands of Brotherhood supporters continued to protest in front of Cairo's Rouba Adawiya mosque as army troops watched from a distance.

Top opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei called for the “immediate formation” of an interim government, in the wake of the violence.  ElBaradei had been the initial favorite to head that government, before meeting resistance from the Nour Party.

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by: Sandrine from: UAE
July 09, 2013 4:35 PM
The Muslim brotherhood are the group behind many terrorist attacks, including the bombing of the world trade centre in 1993. They are def a terrorist organization. I would take the word of the military and NOT a group of terrorists. I feel that if the military really wanted to take them out, they would, and the outcome would be a lot more than 'dozens' of deaths. Meanwhile, I was reading they killed a priest in Sinai and also a Sheikh. And threw some teenagers off a building. What a disgrace. What religion are these people following. Here in the UAE, they arrested 50 or 60 of them as they tried to overthrow our Sheikh only a few weeks ago! Whether its a military coup or a revolution, there is no way a group like this should be in power in any country.


by: omar from: london
July 09, 2013 4:59 AM
1 - Mursi was an elected president, in every democracy if you do not like the president you wait until next elections.
2 - Army returned bullets against stones.


by: Saif from: Cairo
July 08, 2013 6:13 PM
I have no remorse for these thugs. What did they expect when they went to attack a military institution?? To be greeted with hugs and flowers? In my opinion they knew the risks, they forced the army to react and defend themselves. They should just calm down, and accept that Morsi isn't coming back.


by: ali baba from: new york
July 08, 2013 6:02 PM
Muslim brotherhood will not change the will of people. they have to stop violence

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