News / Middle East

Early Results in Egyptian Election Show Huge Win for Sissi

An Egyptian man casts his vote at a polling station in Cairo, Egypt, on May 28, 2014.
An Egyptian man casts his vote at a polling station in Cairo, Egypt, on May 28, 2014.
VOA News
Early results in Egypt's presidential election show former army chief Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi heading for an overwhelming victory.

The first results give Sissi about 93% of the vote while the only other candidate, leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi, has around 3 percent.

Voter turnout was a low 44 percent even after voters were given an extra day Wednesday to cast ballots. Final official results are expected next week.

The Muslim Brotherhood urged an election boycott. It accuses Sissi and his allies of "frauds and tricks." It has called a Sissi presidency a continuation of the military takeover of Egypt that started last year when the army overthrew Islamist president Mohamed Morsi.

Morsi and a number of Muslim brotherhood backers are on trial over the deaths of anti-government protesters.

Sissi says the Brotherhood has no future in Egypt.
 
The Islamist group said Tuesday that Sissi and his allies will not be able to legitimize their actions with "more fraud and tricks."
 
Leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi is the only other candidate on the ballot. Official results are expected next week.

Political turmoil persisted
 
Egypt has seen three years of political turmoil since the popular uprising that pushed former leader Hosni Mubarak from power in early 2011. Morsi became Egypt's first democratically elected president in 2012, but he lasted only a year in office before protesters held mass rallies accusing him of trying to monopolize power and failing to fix Egypt's economy.
 
His ouster set off protests from the Muslim Brotherhood and a violent military crackdown that left more than 1,000 people dead.  Many of the Brotherhood's leaders have been arrested, and Sissi has said the group has no future in Egypt.
 
An army-backed interim government has been overseeing a roadmap for a new constitution and elections for president and parliament. Voters overwhelmingly approved a referendum on the constitution in January. The vote for parliament is expected later this year.
 
Before Morsi, all of Egypt's presidents had come from the military ranks.  Sissi said that although he has a military background, the army will "not have a role in ruling Egypt."

Reuters contributed to this report.

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by: enessfellenz from: New jersey
May 29, 2014 3:13 AM
Those who object to Sisi because of a very real state of heavy handed control over the political, social and cultural life of Egypt are at best myopic in their view of conditions throughout that nation. They are actually blind to the realities of life under Morsi and since at the hands of Islamists which entailed Christians being literally slaughtered and under ever increasing daily attack virtually everywhere in the land of the pyramids. And what was more frightening was that the violent perpetrators of arson, bombings, shootings, rapes, robbery and other brazen debauchery didn't give a damn that anyone, including the entire world, knew what they were doing. They were admittedly pursuing establishment of an Islamic state to the exclusion and detriment of all others, including the Coptic Christian minority representing ten percent of the population of Egypt. They were killing, butchering, terrorizing and harassing ten percent and more of their nation's people, their fellow citizens. Yet some people argue that their irresponsibly myopic and wrong perspective should dictate that Sisi must take a different approach to quashing violent dissent and radical calls for violent terrorism against neighbors, and replace his plain excess in state control with a far less authoritarian regime. In other words allow for an environment of resurgence that replaces one dictatorial regime that is nevertheless practicing law and order and general tolerance with more than likely a former regime that has proven to be far more dictatorial, murderous and intolerant of those who are not Muslim or not Muslim enough in thought and lifestyle. -- the Morsi, Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi supported regime. They want Sisi's regime to cease its crackdown and allow, through the now deposed bad guys still led by Morsi, for the resurgence of militant Islam and a reemergence of their vain spiritual conceit and their accompanying violent repression of minorities and of the not so religious segment of Islam.They don't understand that circumstances of political and social order historically dictate for more stringent controls and infringement upon civilian life by government where disorder, rebellion and chaos realistically threaten. I don't think the surviving loved ones, neighbors and friends of the deceased victims murdered during Morsi's days in office feel the same way. I think they think as I do and as people of reasoned fairness think -- that such thinking of a present or even foreseeable change in approach by Sisi and his supporters is not reasoned or compassionate thinking at all, and, at least, not too rational or sane.


by: meanbill from: USA
May 28, 2014 8:54 AM
CRAZY isn't it? -- I remember when the western world and news media praised the (Arab Spring uprisings) that their spy agencies helped incite, in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, and Yemen? -- (AND NOW?) -- show me one single Arab country that had an (Arab Spring uprising), that is better off and at peace today? --- YEA, who did the (Arab Spring uprisings) benefit? --- (NOT THE ARABS).... or Egypt?

In Response

by: Moe from: USA/EGYPT
May 29, 2014 2:57 AM
Its not 1970s Iran, facebook and corruption where behind the Arab spring, not assassinations. In the long term i believe Egypt will be better off because of it. We now have presidential term limits. I do think that foreign agency played a role in the brotherhoods power grab because of their foreign funding and backing. For this election foreign funding was prohibited for this exact reason. Brotherhood is reported to have been created in the 1920s to serve foreign interests by destabilizing Egypt. Hopefully that is over, for good. This election is a great thing for Egypt and im glad we have a new president which i support!

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