News / Middle East

Early Results in Egyptian Election Show Huge Win for Sissi

An Egyptian man casts his vote at a polling station in Cairo, Egypt, on May 28, 2014.
An Egyptian man casts his vote at a polling station in Cairo, Egypt, on May 28, 2014.
VOA News
Early results in Egypt's presidential election show former army chief Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi heading for an overwhelming victory.

The first results give Sissi about 93% of the vote while the only other candidate, leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi, has around 3 percent.

Voter turnout was a low 44 percent even after voters were given an extra day Wednesday to cast ballots. Final official results are expected next week.

The Muslim Brotherhood urged an election boycott. It accuses Sissi and his allies of "frauds and tricks." It has called a Sissi presidency a continuation of the military takeover of Egypt that started last year when the army overthrew Islamist president Mohamed Morsi.

Morsi and a number of Muslim brotherhood backers are on trial over the deaths of anti-government protesters.

Sissi says the Brotherhood has no future in Egypt.
The Islamist group said Tuesday that Sissi and his allies will not be able to legitimize their actions with "more fraud and tricks."
Leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi is the only other candidate on the ballot. Official results are expected next week.

Political turmoil persisted
Egypt has seen three years of political turmoil since the popular uprising that pushed former leader Hosni Mubarak from power in early 2011. Morsi became Egypt's first democratically elected president in 2012, but he lasted only a year in office before protesters held mass rallies accusing him of trying to monopolize power and failing to fix Egypt's economy.
His ouster set off protests from the Muslim Brotherhood and a violent military crackdown that left more than 1,000 people dead.  Many of the Brotherhood's leaders have been arrested, and Sissi has said the group has no future in Egypt.
An army-backed interim government has been overseeing a roadmap for a new constitution and elections for president and parliament. Voters overwhelmingly approved a referendum on the constitution in January. The vote for parliament is expected later this year.
Before Morsi, all of Egypt's presidents had come from the military ranks.  Sissi said that although he has a military background, the army will "not have a role in ruling Egypt."

Reuters contributed to this report.

You May Like

Obama: Action on Climate Change 'Economic, Security Imperative'

President spoke to reporters on sidelines of UN Climate Summit outside Paris, where leaders are working to agree on binding measures

IMF Bets on China’s Resolve to Reform

IMF announcement already raising questions about just how much Beijing is committed to such reforms

UNICEF: Hidden Epidemic of HIV Among Adolescents

Researchers warn that Asia Pacific nations facing sharp rise in incidence of HIV among adolescents

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
by: enessfellenz from: New jersey
May 29, 2014 3:13 AM
Those who object to Sisi because of a very real state of heavy handed control over the political, social and cultural life of Egypt are at best myopic in their view of conditions throughout that nation. They are actually blind to the realities of life under Morsi and since at the hands of Islamists which entailed Christians being literally slaughtered and under ever increasing daily attack virtually everywhere in the land of the pyramids. And what was more frightening was that the violent perpetrators of arson, bombings, shootings, rapes, robbery and other brazen debauchery didn't give a damn that anyone, including the entire world, knew what they were doing. They were admittedly pursuing establishment of an Islamic state to the exclusion and detriment of all others, including the Coptic Christian minority representing ten percent of the population of Egypt. They were killing, butchering, terrorizing and harassing ten percent and more of their nation's people, their fellow citizens. Yet some people argue that their irresponsibly myopic and wrong perspective should dictate that Sisi must take a different approach to quashing violent dissent and radical calls for violent terrorism against neighbors, and replace his plain excess in state control with a far less authoritarian regime. In other words allow for an environment of resurgence that replaces one dictatorial regime that is nevertheless practicing law and order and general tolerance with more than likely a former regime that has proven to be far more dictatorial, murderous and intolerant of those who are not Muslim or not Muslim enough in thought and lifestyle. -- the Morsi, Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi supported regime. They want Sisi's regime to cease its crackdown and allow, through the now deposed bad guys still led by Morsi, for the resurgence of militant Islam and a reemergence of their vain spiritual conceit and their accompanying violent repression of minorities and of the not so religious segment of Islam.They don't understand that circumstances of political and social order historically dictate for more stringent controls and infringement upon civilian life by government where disorder, rebellion and chaos realistically threaten. I don't think the surviving loved ones, neighbors and friends of the deceased victims murdered during Morsi's days in office feel the same way. I think they think as I do and as people of reasoned fairness think -- that such thinking of a present or even foreseeable change in approach by Sisi and his supporters is not reasoned or compassionate thinking at all, and, at least, not too rational or sane.

by: meanbill from: USA
May 28, 2014 8:54 AM
CRAZY isn't it? -- I remember when the western world and news media praised the (Arab Spring uprisings) that their spy agencies helped incite, in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, and Yemen? -- (AND NOW?) -- show me one single Arab country that had an (Arab Spring uprising), that is better off and at peace today? --- YEA, who did the (Arab Spring uprisings) benefit? --- (NOT THE ARABS).... or Egypt?
In Response

by: Moe from: USA/EGYPT
May 29, 2014 2:57 AM
Its not 1970s Iran, facebook and corruption where behind the Arab spring, not assassinations. In the long term i believe Egypt will be better off because of it. We now have presidential term limits. I do think that foreign agency played a role in the brotherhoods power grab because of their foreign funding and backing. For this election foreign funding was prohibited for this exact reason. Brotherhood is reported to have been created in the 1920s to serve foreign interests by destabilizing Egypt. Hopefully that is over, for good. This election is a great thing for Egypt and im glad we have a new president which i support!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
With HIV, Can We Get to Zero?i
Carol Pearson
November 29, 2015 1:23 PM
The theme of this year's World AIDS Day is "Getting to Zero." The U.N. says new HIV infections have been reduced by 35 percent since 2000 and AIDS-related deaths are down by 42 percent since the peak in 2004. VOA's Carol Pearson takes a look at what it might take to actually have an AIDS-free generation.

Video With HIV, Can We Get to Zero?

The theme of this year's World AIDS Day is "Getting to Zero." The U.N. says new HIV infections have been reduced by 35 percent since 2000 and AIDS-related deaths are down by 42 percent since the peak in 2004. VOA's Carol Pearson takes a look at what it might take to actually have an AIDS-free generation.

Video Political Motives Seen Behind Cancelled Cambodian Water Festival

For the fourth time in the five years since more than 350 people were killed in a stampede at Cambodia’s annual water festival, authorities canceled the event this year. Officials blamed environmental reasons as the cause, but many see it as fallout from rising political tensions with a fresh wave of ruling party intimidation against the opposition. David Boyle and Kimlong Meng report from Phnom Penh.

Video African Circus Gives At-Risk Youth a 2nd Chance

Ethiopia hosted the first African Circus Arts Festival this past weekend with performers from seven different African countries. Most of the performers are youngsters coming form challenging backgrounds who say the circus gave them a second chance.

Video US Lawmakers Brace for End-of-Year Battles

U.S. lawmakers are returning to Washington for Congress’ final working weeks of the year. And, as VOA's Michael Bowman reports, a full slate of legislative business awaits them, from keeping the federal government open to resolving a battle with the White House over the admittance of Syrian refugees.

Video Taiwan Looks for Role in South China Sea Dispute

The Taiwanese government is one of several that claims territory in the hotly contested South China Sea, but Taipei has long been sidelined in the dispute, overshadowed by China. Now, as the Philippines challenges Beijing’s claims in an international court at The Hague, Taipei is looking to publicly assert its claims. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.

Video After Terrorist Attacks, Support for Refugees Fades

The terrorists who killed and injured almost 500 people around Paris this month are mostly French or Belgian nationals. But at least two apparently took advantage of Europe’s migrant crisis to sneak into the region. The discovery has hardened views about legitimate refugees, including those fleeing the same extremist violence that hit the French capital. Lisa Bryant has this report for VOA from the Paris suburb of Cergy-Pontoise

Video Syrian Refugees in US Express Concern for Those Left Behind

Syrian immigrants in the United States are concerned about the negative tide of public opinion and the politicians who want to block a U.S. plan to accept 10,000 Syrian refugees. Zlatica Hoke reports many Americans are fighting to dispel suspicions linking refugees to terrorists.

Video Thais Send Security Concerns Down the River

As Thailand takes in the annual Loy Krathong festival, many ponder the country’s future and security. Steve Sandford reports from Chiang Mai.

Video Islamic State Unfazed by Losses in Iraq, Syria

Progress in the U.S.-led effort to beat Islamic State on its home turf in Iraq and Syria has led some to speculate the terror group may be growing desperate. But counterterror officials say that is not the case, and warn the recent spate of terror attacks is merely part of the group’s evolution. VOA National Security correspondent Jeff Seldin has more.

Video Belgium-Germany Border Remains Porous, Even As Manhunt For Paris Attacker Continues

One of the suspected gunmen in the Nov. 13 Paris attacks, Salah Abdeslam, evaded law enforcement, made his way to Belgium, and is now believed to have fled to Germany. VOA correspondent Ayesha Tanzeem makes the journey across the border from Belgium into Germany to see how porous the borders really are.

Video US, Cambodian Navies Pair Up in Gulf of Thailand

The U.S. Navy has deployed one of its newest and most advanced ships to Cambodia to conduct joint training drills in the Gulf of Thailand. Riding hull-to-hull with Cambodian ships, the seamen of the USS Fort Worth are executing joint-training drills that will help build relations in Southeast Asia. David Boyle reports for VOA from Preah Sihanouk province.

Video Uncertain Future for Syrian Refugee Resettlement in Illinois

For the trickle of Syrian refugees finding new homes in the Midwest city of Chicago, the call to end resettlement in many U.S. states is adding another dimension to their long journey fleeing war. Organizations working to help them integrate say the backlash since the Paris attacks is both harming and helping their efforts to provide refugees sanctuary. VOA's Kane Farabaugh reports.

VOA Blogs