News / Asia

Xi Jinping Slated to Assume Top Position in Chinese Government

Chinese VP to Assume Top Position in Chinese Governmenti
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Stephanie Ho
November 08, 2012 5:53 PM
Chinese Vice-President Xi Jinping is widely expected to be chosen as China's next top leader. The veteran politician has had experience both in the Chinese countryside and in the country's top halls of power. We have this profile of the ascendant leader written by Stephanie Ho and voiced by Bill Ide.
Stephanie Ho
Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping is widely expected to be chosen as China's next top leader.  The veteran politician has had experience both in the Chinese countryside and in the country's top halls of power.
 
Xi Jinping was relatively unknown abroad until this past year, when he made a series of high-profile appearances with visiting dignitaries.

Xi’s father was politically prominent, which makes the vice president what Chinese call a "princeling." Many people in communist China tend to unfavorably view princelings as elitist. But Xi has humble experiences that make him different, says Macau University public policy professor Wang Jianwei.

"Xi’s father was persecuted during the Cultural Revolution so, as a result, he also suffered too and had to go to the countryside," said Jianwei.

Xi was sent to Liangjiahe village in Shaanxi province when he was only 15.
 
Pictures of the now famous Xi line the walls of the home of Shi Chunyang, the village’s party secretary.

Villager Shi Yudong knew Xi then and says he left a favorable impression.

"I feel that, because he climbed up the ladder from the countryside, he knows something about corruption. So there is hope he will do something about it," said Yudong.

Xi spent time in the military and later became governor of Fujian, the mainland province just across the water from Taiwan.

Those experiences smoothed his political rise and made him popular at home. Xiong Zhiyong, a diplomacy professor at Beijing’s Foreign Affairs College, says although his rise to president is assured, his continuing popularity is not.

"It doesn’t matter whether people like or dislike him. Everybody knows that he will be the president of China. But, in regards to whether people will like his policies, it’s too early to say," said Zhiyong.

Xi echoes other Chinese leaders in talking about their desire for close cooperation with the United States. In January, he spoke about a wide range of global issues where the two countries are already working together.

"We have maintained close dialogue on the international financial crisis, climate change, the Korean peninsula, the Iranian nuclear issue. Sino-American cooperation and coordination are playing an even more important role in world peace, stability and prosperity," said Xi.

But despite such cooperation, there remain serious points of disagreement, including U.S. allegations of Chinese repression in ethnic Tibetan areas, the standoff over Syria and China’s trade and monetary policies.

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