World News

Weapons Watchdog Receives Nobel Peace Prize

The head of a watchdog group that is trying to rid the world of chemical weapons has accepted the Nobel Peace Prize at a ceremony in the Norwegian capital.

Ahmet Uzumcu, director-general of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, collected the award Tuesday on behalf of the Netherlands-based group.

Nobel committee chairman Thorbjorn Jagland said the "anonymous inspectors from the OPCW do an extremely important and difficult job."

Later in the day, the other Nobel prizes -- for physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and economic sciences -- will be presented at a separate ceremony in Stockholm.



Laureates receive medals, diplomas, and monetary awards worth $1.2 million. The ceremonies take place during a week of festivities including lectures, academic discussions, and a grand banquet honoring the winners.

Twelve of the laureates are collecting their awards in person. The 13th is Literature winner Alice Munro, who remains in her native Canada because of her health.

The 2013 Nobel laureates include Physics prize winners Francois Englert and Peter Higgs; Chemistry laureates Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel; and Medicine prize winners James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Sudhof. The Economic Sciences award goes to Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen, and Robert Shiller.

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