News / Africa

World Leaders Remember Nelson Mandela

The World Mourns President Mandelai
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December 06, 2013 8:45 AM
South Africans and people around the world have been paying tribute to the late former South African president Nelson Mandela.
VOA News
U.S. President Barack Obama has called the widow of Nelson Mandela to express his condolences.  

President Obama spoke with Graca Machel Friday to tell her of the profound influence Mandela had on his life.  

He also thanked Machel for the joy she brought to her late husband's life and the commitment to a peaceful, fair and loving world that she and President Mandela shared.  

Earlier at the White House, a solemn President Obama called Mandela an influential, courageous, and profoundly good human being.

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the death of Nelson Mandela in the briefing room of the White House, Dec. 5, 2013.President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the death of Nelson Mandela in the briefing room of the White House, Dec. 5, 2013.
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President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the death of Nelson Mandela in the briefing room of the White House, Dec. 5, 2013.
President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the death of Nelson Mandela in the briefing room of the White House, Dec. 5, 2013.
"I am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from Nelson Mandela's life. My very first political action, the first thing I ever did that involved an issue, or a policy, or politics, was a protest against apartheid," said Obama. "I would study his words and his writings. The day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears."

Obama said flags at the White House and other public buildings will fly at half staff through Monday, in a rare gesture toward a foreign leader.

FILE - Former South African president FW de Klerk.FILE - Former South African president FW de Klerk.
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FILE - Former South African president FW de Klerk.
FILE - Former South African president FW de Klerk.
F.W. de Klerk, South Africa's last apartheid leader, said Mandela's greatest legacy is his emphasis on reconciliation. De Klerk won a Nobel Peace Prize alongside Mandela, whom he freed from prison in 1990. He said their relationship was "often stormy," but that they were "always able to come together at critical moments."
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 Many African leaders, who were in Paris for a security summit Friday, vowed to live up to the example Mandela set.

South African Archbishop and anti-apartheid activist Desmond Tutu called his friend a "precious diamond" who emerged from prison "virtually flawless." Tutu said instead of "calling for his pound of flesh, he proclaimed the message of forgiveness and reconciliation."
 
FILE - Kofi AnnanFILE - Kofi Annan
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FILE - Kofi Annan
FILE - Kofi Annan
Ex-U.N. chief Kofi Annan, who along with Tutu and Mandela formed a group of statesmen known as The Elders, said South Africa was fortunate to have a leader that inspired forgiveness so that the country "did not go up in flames."

Fellow Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi paid tribute to Mandela as a "great human being who raised the standard of humanity."

"He made us all understand that nobody should be penalized for the color of his skin, for the circumstances into which he is born. He also made us understand that we can change the world. We can change the world by changing attitudes, by changing perceptions," Suu Kyi said.
 
FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai LamaFILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama
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FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama
FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama
The Dalai Lama, another Nobel Peace laureate, said he will "personally miss a dear friend" he had hoped to meet again. He said that although Mandela has physically departed, his "spirit will go on."

India's Prime Minister Manmohan Signh called Mandela "a giant among men," and compared him to India's own icon of freedom and reconciliation, Mahatma Gandhi.

Meanwhile, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called on people to be inspired by  Mandela to keep working for a better and more just world. "Nelson Mandela showed what is possible for our world and within each one of us - if we believe, dream and work together for justice and humanity. His moral force was decisive in dismantling the system of apartheid," said Ban.


FILE - Former President Bill ClintonFILE - Former President Bill Clinton
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FILE - Former President Bill Clinton
FILE - Former President Bill Clinton
Former U.S. Presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush also praised Mandela as a champion of freedom, human dignity, and equality.

Another ex-U.S. president, George H. W. Bush, called Mandela, "a man of tremendous moral courage, who changed the course of history in his country."

British Prime Minister David Cameron emerged from 10 Downing Street to call Mandela a true global hero, saying a great light has gone out in the world.
 
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called him a man of vision who rejected violence and was one of "the most honorable figures of our time."
 
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, meanwhile, hailed Mandela as a "symbol of freedom from colonialism and occupation," calling his death "a great loss."
 
China's President Xi JinpingChina's President Xi Jinping
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China's President Xi Jinping
China's President Xi Jinping
Chinese President Xi Jinping expressed "deep grief" at the death of what he called a "world-renowned statesman." He said Mandela, who visited China twice, will always be remembered for his contributions to China-South African ties "and the cause of human progress."
 
Haitian President Michel Martelly said Mandela remains a "symbol of democracy" whose courage and "faith in the true struggle for equality" continue to guide mankind.

Pope Francis also expressed condolences, and said he prays that Mandela's example will inspire generations of South Africans.

Interactive Timeline: The Life of Nelson Mandela

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Jose M Lopez Sierra from: Puerto Rico
December 07, 2013 7:40 PM
Greeting Partners,

President Obama should also reflect on Oscar López Rivera, who is also doing for Puerto Rico what Nelson Mandela did for South Africa.

José
www.TodosUnidosDescolonizarPR.blogspot.com


by: Mrs. Kay Berry from: USA
December 07, 2013 12:06 PM
And never mind the FACT that he was co-founder of a terrorist organization that killed scores of people. Just never mind that.


by: Dr. Friar from: San Diego,CA
December 07, 2013 11:24 AM
There is absolutely no comparison between George Washington and Nelson Mandela.

George Washington was a Founding Father. He presided over the convention that drafted the Constitution and warned the nation against partisanship, sectionalism, and involvement in foreign wars.

Nelson Mandela was… well, a communist and a terrorist.

Mandela was a member of the South African Communist Party. He co-founded Umkhonto we Sizwe, a terrorist organization that killed civilians, including children. Fast food outlets and supermarkets were favored targets. In addition to terrorist bombings, the military wing of the African National Congress tortured and executed suspected government agents.

Post-apartheid South Africa is ruled by the ANC and the South African Communist Party. The ruling ANC defines itself as a “disciplined force of the left.”

Listening to Obama, however, you wouldn’t know that Nelson Mandela is a former communist and terrorist. He has compared the man to George Washington.

“Mandela shows what was possible when a priority is placed on human dignity, respect for law, that all people are treated equally,” Obama said on a trip to South Africa.

“And what Nelson Mandela also stood for is that the well-being of the country is more important than the interests of any one person,” Obama continued. “George Washington is admired because after two terms he said enough, I’m going back to being a citizen. There were no term limits, but he said I’m a citizen. I served my time. And it’s time for the next person, because that’s what democracy is about. And Mandela similarly was able to recognize that, despite how revered he was, that part of this transition process was greater than one person.”

Obama does what he is told. He reads from a script. It doesn’t matter if he personally prefers communism or the brand of socialism so-called conservatives accuse him of subscribing to. Obama’s political opinions are irrelevant.

Obama’s globalist handlers like socialism – a kinder and gentler word for communism – because it is an effective tool for controlling the masses. Globalist kingpin David Rockefeller said as much when he praised Mao and Chinese communism, a political machine responsible for killing more humans than both Hitler and Stalin.

“Whatever the price of the Chinese Revolution, it has obviously succeeded, not only in producing a more efficient and dedicated administration but also in fostering high morale and community of purpose,” Rockefeller said on the pages of the New York Times in 1973. “The social experiment in China under Chairman Mao’s leadership is one of the most important and successful in human history.”

Rockefeller was also fond of the Soviets and their thugocracy established by Wall Street. “My congratulations on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the October Revolution,” he told the Kremlin in 1977.

Solzhenitsyn and others put the death toll in the Soviet Union between 1917 and 1987 at over 60 million.

Naturally, ABC and the rest of the Mockingbird corporatized media including VOA, didn’t bother to mention Mandela’s terrorist and communist past. It did not mention the ANC’s habit of necklacing its enemies back in the day, a practice enthusiastically endorsed by Nelson Mandela’s wife, Winnie Mandela.

Necklacing was the practice of putting a tire filled with gasoline around the neck of accused collaborators and enemies of the ANC. After ignited, it often took more than 20 minutes for the necklace to kill its victim.

However some will miss this mans covered over past, and fly their flags at half mast. Very Ironic.


by: Tsam from: nigeria
December 07, 2013 6:34 AM
May his gentle soul rest in perfect peace the hero of south african


by: Muriel from: Rouse
December 06, 2013 1:09 PM
Nelson Mandela is a great man. Everyone should walk by his example. Yesterday are Lord welcomed home a one of a kind son. <><*

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