News / Asia

Xi Slams Japan's 'Barbaric' Militarists

Chinese President Xi Jinping smiles during a meeting with South Korean National Assembly Speaker Chung Ui-hwa at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, July 4, 2014.
Chinese President Xi Jinping smiles during a meeting with South Korean National Assembly Speaker Chung Ui-hwa at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, July 4, 2014.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has denounced what he called Japan's "barbaric" colonial aggression against China and Korea as he continues his two-day visit to Seoul.

During a speech Friday at Seoul National University, Xi said Chinese and South Koreans experienced "enormous suffering" as a result of Japan's imperial aggression in the first half of the 20th century.

The comments come a day after Xi offered to hold joint memorial activities with South Korea to mark next year's 70th anniversary of Japan's defeat in World War II.

South Korea and China were two of the biggest victims of Japanese imperialism. Both countries also have separate modern-day territorial disputes with Japan and are concerned with Tokyo's attempts to expand the role of its military.

Many observers see Xi's trip to South Korea, his first since taking office, as part of an attempt by Beijing to bring Seoul closer into its sphere of influence and thereby alienate Japan.

On Thursday, Xi and South Korean President Park Geun-hye agreed to expand the already robust ties between their two economies.

At a joint news briefing with Xi, Park said Seoul and Beijing will work to complete a long-negotiated free trade agreement by the end of the year.

Seoul's Finance Ministry also said the two sides agreed to introduce direct trading between the South Korean won and the Chinese yuan, a measure that will expand the use of China's currency.

The yuan joins the dollar as the only currency directly convertible with the won.

President Park also said she agreed with Xi the Korean peninsula should be denuclearized and they "resolutely" oppose further nuclear tests by North Korea.

Before the trip, China's Communist Party-run Global Times hailed South Korea as being an "exemplar of good neighbor relations." The editorial said ties have been "particularly thriving" amid what it called an "intricate and complex" situation in Northeast Asia.

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by: dc from: NYC
July 05, 2014 9:00 AM
China is a country that does not follow international law and its human rights are among the worst in the world. It resorts to talking down of Japan in order to incite nationalism and to divert the attention from its real issues i.e. inequality, corruptions and one-party rule. The truth is what Japan did was 70 years ago and what did China do since the end of world war ii? It kissed and made up with China, telling the Japan government that "it appreciated Japan's invasion as otherwise Chinese communist party would have been eliminated" by the national government at the time. It never told this history to its own people. The communist party killed tens of millions people since 1949 and never apologized (remember Tiananmen square?).

If anyone should apologize, it should be the communist party in China. It is also probably the worst when it comes to internet and press censorship. There is absolutely no press freedom and rules of law in China!


by: Kyle Mitchell from: Chicago
July 05, 2014 3:26 AM
Why can't China forget the past? Japan already apologized 21 times for their actions in WWII.

by: Igor from: Russia
July 05, 2014 3:21 AM
The fact is that Japan has never bullied any countries since the end of world war II whereas China continue to be a Pirate State in Asia just like their ancestors did for thousands of years.
The fact is that almost all countries in the World are in favour of Japan against the aggression of China.

by: Air Force One from: USA
July 05, 2014 2:26 AM
Who cares much about the past? Paying attention about what is going on now!

by: Ben
July 05, 2014 2:03 AM
Authoritarian, communist China is a joke. Nippon banzai!

by: sam from: houston
July 05, 2014 1:44 AM
Obama and Kerry are bogged down with Palestine, Syria and other Middle eastern concerns, while Chinese leaders are travelling around the globe and making deals and agreements! We have been stupid/blind to NOT see the rapid rise of china! When are going to wise up and do something truely good for the country. China will rule within the next 10-15 years! Nothing can stop, nothing.

by: deutsch from: los angeles
July 04, 2014 11:49 PM
Chinese move in relation to South Korea is an attempt to divide American allies - Japan and S. Korea. By the way, Japan has been promising Vietnam some coast guard ships. "where are the beef?" VN asking.

by: youngthing from: nowhere
July 04, 2014 11:43 PM
Chinese always say their country is the bigger and the stronger country in the region. With this thinking, they claim most of the South China Sea as their own core territory. Even a part of Indian is in the new 10 dash-line map of China. According to some China Magazines, China territory expanded to Ural mountain in which a part of Siberia (Russia now) belonged to chinese ancients. A country with fastest economic growth, instead of using friendly policies to expend its ties with neighbouring countries and join the peacekeeping force, it boost its army to threaten region security. What it is doing in the region such as

Robbing the Paracels 1974 (belonged to South Republic of Vietnam)

Robbing some of Spratly 1988 (belongs to Vietnam)

Robbing Scarborough (belongs to Philippines)

Claiming the Air Defense Zone in East China Sea which bites a part of Senkaku (belongs to Japan)

Putting the oil rig 981 in Vietnam Exclusive Economic Zone,

Putting the oil rig 9 in the overlapping area (between China and Vietnam).

....

With the harming threats to region security above, China simply explained its their core territory. Instead of proving its actions by law and by multi and bilateral talks, it has thrown the current law to trash and using muscle to protect its unfounded claims.

There's one thing Chinese must remember, What they call smaller coutries... once saved them from the Japan Militarism regime. If there hadn't had smaller countries, such as Korea, Soviet Union, United State of America... supporting you, China/Chinese would have still been slaves... So please stop calling yourself the bigger... respect other countries, help to resolve the existing issues in the region instead of showing off your strength military. Together live in Peace, you will recieve more than what you are looking for in your neighbour houses.

by: Crom from: EGYPT
July 04, 2014 10:40 PM
I am sorry but doesn't China have nukes? And have a military that's 4 times bigger than Japan? Who's the real barbarian here?
In Response

by: i4stock
July 04, 2014 11:54 PM
According to your logic, who do you think is the barbarian here, US or China?

by: sea eagle from: us
July 04, 2014 8:55 PM
china keep going back to the past to create trouble then we go back to the past. if not for communist china there would have been one korea,communist chinese kill thousands of south korean troops and civilians,displace millions,kills thousands of american troops and UN troops,torture captured troops,now south korean thats is what communist china did to your country.
In Response

by: Henry janson from: China
July 05, 2014 2:58 AM
Come on, this is no true, Americans and Russians decided to divide the Korean peninsula into two parts at end of WWII,Russians asked Americans for the idea of how to do it, Americans gave a rush idea within 45min before the US-Russian Summit by using 38th Parallel. it was recorded in US middle school text book, you know this better
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