News / Africa

ZANU-PF Broke the Law, Says Opposition MDC

Zimbabwe Elections
Zimbabwe Elections
Peter Clottey
The spokesman for Zimbabwe’s main opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) says his group has evidence that senior ZANU-PF officials including the first lady contravened the constitution as well as the electoral laws in the run up to the July 31st general election.

“There is evidence that President Mugabe for example was dolling out gifts; teacups as well as teapots and so on, to supporters in return to votes. His wife was giving food stuffs and is on television and video,” said MDC spokesman Douglas Mwonzora.

He says the constitution as well as the country’s electoral law outlaws gift giving during elections.

Mwonzora says interim reports from both the African Union (AU) and the Southern African Development Community’s (SADC) poll observer groups support the MDC’s stance that the elections were not credible.

“In fact the reports of the African Union and SADC have actually made our case even stronger. In terms of their report the election was peaceful and free, but it was not fair,” said Mwonzora. “Our constitution is very clear that an election must be peaceful and free and fair. We have presented to them our dossier of the malpractices of this election.”

The main opposition party filed a petition last Friday challenging the electoral victory of President Mugabe and the ZANU-PF parliamentary majority win.

“The MDC is challenging principally on 15 grounds; the deposition of the voters role, disenfranchisement of the people of Zimbabwe as well as intimidation, and in some instances violence,” said Mwonzora.

Both the AU and the SADC poll observers described the Zimbabwe elections are free and peaceful. But while the AU said the general election was peaceful and harmonized, the SADC stopped short of calling it fair.

Mwonzora’s comments came after the MDC petitioned the constitutional court seeking to nullify the re-election of President Robert Mugabe and his ZANU-PF parliamentary majority win.

The constitutional court has to rule within 14 days after the petition was filed, according to the constitution.                 

“The chief justice will call the lawyers [this] week from both sides to see how this matter can be dealt with because it involves a lot of evidence,” said Mwonzora.

Citing the constitution, analysts, say it is unlikely Mr. Mugabe as well as members of parliament would be installed until the court hands down its ruling within the stipulated period.

“The MDC is not perturbed by the injustice of this case. We are saying we are putting this information to the court as well as to the public. But we are saying to the court that we want to see how unjust you can be,” said Mwonzora.

Some Zimbabweans say the prospects of the court challenge look bleak claiming the court and other state institutions including the security agencies are Mugabe sympathizers.                     

“We are aware of the odds against us but in this particular case the persons on trial are not the MDC, it is Robert Mugabe, the courts, the Zimbabwe electoral authorities. So what we are doing is we are putting before them insurmountable evidence and saying to them act in terms of the law,” said Mwonzora.
Clottey interview with Douglas Mwonzora, MDC spokesman
Clottey interview with Douglas Mwonzora, MDC spokesman i
|| 0:00:00
...    
🔇
X

You May Like

Unpaid Kurdish Fighters Sign of Economic Woes

Sharp cuts in Kurdistan's budget by Baghdad, falling oil revenue, coping with refugees, inflated public sector have hit regional economy hard More

Koreas Exchange List of Envoys for Family Reunion Talks

Officials will discuss date, venue and number of participants for reunion; Seoul hopes to hold event late this month More

China Targets 197 in Online Speech Crackdown

Nearly 200 punished for 'spreading rumors' online in ongoing crackdown on free speech More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Monte McMurchy from: Toronto Canada
August 12, 2013 8:58 AM
The Lack of ‘Civitas’ in Zimbabwe which ensured that the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission would be compromised

Compromised–July 31 Election in Zimbabwe

When an election “is seriously compromised” [stated by several Independent Observer Groups who expressed concern in that thousands of eligible voters were disenfranchised for perhaps not supporting the status quo ] as is now becoming most apparent in the July 31/13 national election in Zimbabwe. The salient issue is: What can the International Community of Electoral Advisors do in addressing this combustive technical and public policy concern in persuading the ZEC to step up and take full civic electoral responsibility in investigating these profound allegations of electoral fraud.

The failure of young democracies [Zimbabwe, Afghanistan, Thailand, South Africa, DRC, Libya] has enormous inter-continent consequences notwithstanding that the ‘democracy idea’ eventually and ultimately will be the end state of every nation on earth. This ‘democracy idea’ remains a most powerful seductive concept [Fukuyama]. In the long run, democracy is on balance the best political system—-not because it allows citizens essential fundamental freedoms but because democracy as a normative concept enhances transparency and rule of law which in the long run will foster and encourage prescriptive ordinal citizen prosperity—the fundamental ontological essence of ‘civitas’—- essential in pluralistic dynamic flowering and flourishing of values connoting and promoting respect, peace, and good order.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Calais School Offers Another Face of Europe’s Migrant Crisisi
X
Lisa Bryant
September 02, 2015 6:19 PM
Europe is facing mounting criticism over how it’s handling its biggest migration crisis since World War II. But not all Europeans believe building walls or passing repressive policies are the answer. A school for migrants in the French port city of Calais, is opening doors and building bonds across nationalities. VOA's Lisa Bryant reports.
Video

Video Calais School Offers Another Face of Europe’s Migrant Crisis

Europe is facing mounting criticism over how it’s handling its biggest migration crisis since World War II. But not all Europeans believe building walls or passing repressive policies are the answer. A school for migrants in the French port city of Calais, is opening doors and building bonds across nationalities. VOA's Lisa Bryant reports.
Video

Video Russia-Japan Relations Cool as Putin Visits China for WWII Anniversary

Russian President Vladimir Putin is in Beijing for commemorations of the 70th anniversary of China's WWII victory over Japan. Putin is expected to visit Japan later this year, but tensions between Tokyo and Moscow over islands disputed since the war, and sanctions over Ukraine, could pour cold water on the plan. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports.
Video

Video Kurdish Fighters on IS Frontline Ready for Offensive

Finger on the trigger, the Kurdish Peshmerga soldier stared across the dust at a village taken over by Islamic State extremists. The Kurdistan’s Khazir frontline, just 45 minutes from the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul. And at this point, the militants were less than two kilometers away. VOA's Sharon Behn reports.
Video

Video Yemen ‘on Brink of Disaster’ as Medical Shortages Soar

Aid agencies warn Yemen is on the brink of humanitarian disaster – with up to half a million children facing severe malnutrition, and hospitals running out of basic medicines. There are fears Yemen's civil war could escalate as the coalition led by Saudi Arabia tries to drive back Houthi rebels, who seized control of much of the country earlier this year. Henry Ridgwell reports.
Video

Video Apps Helping Kenyan Businesses Stay Ahead of Counterfeiters

Counterfeit goods in Kenya cost the government as much as $1 billion each year in lost tax revenues. The fake goods also hurt entrepreneurs who find it hard to carve out a niche in the market and retain customers. But as Lenny Ruvaga reports from Nairobi, information technology is being used to try to beat the problem.
Video

Video Nobel Prize Winner Malala Talks to VOA

Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai met with VOA's Deewa service in Washington Sunday to talk about women’s rights and unveil a trailer for her new documentary. VOA's Katherine Gypson has more.
Video

Video War, Drought Threaten Iraq's Marshlands

Iraq's southern wetlands are in crisis. These areas are the spawning ground for Gulf fisheries, a resting place for migrating wildfowl, and source of livelihood for fishermen and herders. Faith Lapidus has more.
Video

Video Colombians Flee Venezuela as Border Crisis Escalates

Hundreds of Colombians have fled Venezuela since last week, amid an escalating border crisis between the two countries. Last week, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro ordered the closure of a key border crossing after smugglers injured three Venezuelan soldiers and a civilian. The president also ordered the deportation of Colombians who are in Venezuela illegally. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Rebuilding New Orleans' Music Scene

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina inundated New Orleans, threatening to wash away its vibrant musical heritage along with its neighborhoods, the beat goes on. As Bronwyn Benito and Faith Lapidus report, a Musicians' Village is preserving the city's unique sound.
Video

Video In Russia, Auto Industry in Tailspin

Industry insiders say country relies too heavily on imports as inflation cuts too many consumers out of the market. Daniel Schearf has more from Moscow.
Video

Video Scientist Calls Use of Fetal Tissue in Medical Research Essential

An anti-abortion group responsible for secret recordings of workers at a women's health care organization claims the workers shown are offering baby parts for sale, a charge the organization strongly denies. While the selling of fetal tissue is against the law in the United States, abortion and the use of donated fetal tissue for medical research are both legal. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video Next to Iran, Climate at Forefront of Obama Agenda

President Barack Obama this week announced new initiatives aimed at making it easier for Americans to access renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Obama is not slowing down when it comes to pushing through climate change measures, an issue he says is the greatest threat to the country’s national security. VOA correspondent Aru Pande has more from the White House.
Video

Video Arctic Draws International Competition for Oil

A new geopolitical “Great Game” is underway in earth’s northernmost region, the Arctic, where Russia has claimed a large area for resource development and President Barack Obama recently approved Shell Oil Company’s test-drilling project in an area under U.S. control. Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Philippine Maritime Police: Chinese Fishermen a Threat to Country’s Security

China and the Philippines both claim maritime rights in the South China Sea.  That includes the right to fish in those waters. Jason Strother reports on how the Philippines is catching Chinese nationals it says are illegal poachers. He has the story from Palawan province.
Video

Video China's Spratly Island Building Said to Light Up the Night 'Like A City'

Southeast Asian countries claim China has illegally seized territory in the Spratly islands. It is especially a concern for a Philippine mayor who says Beijing is occupying parts of his municipality. Jason Strother reports from the capital of Palawan province, Puerto Princesa.

VOA Blogs