News / Africa

Mugabe Re-Elected; Opposition Vows Challenge

Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai gestures during a media briefing in Harare Aug. 3, 2013.
Zimbabwe's Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai gestures during a media briefing in Harare Aug. 3, 2013.
VOA News
Zimbabwe's president, Robert Mugabe, has extended his 33-year rule, being declared the winner of Wednesday's presidential election, despite opposition claims of fraud and concerns raised by other countries.

Zimbabwe's election commission announced Mugabe's victory on Saturday. The commission said Mugabe won a new five-year term with 61 percent of the vote, compared to 34 percent for his longtime rival, Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai.

President Mugabe's ZANU-PF party also won more than a two-thirds majority in parliament, which will allow it to make changes to the constitution. Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change party, meanwhile, won a much smaller fraction of the 210 parliament seats.

Tsvangirai has denounced the presidential and parliamentary vote as a "huge farce," vowing to challenge the results in court and calling for new elections.

"The MDC totally rejects the 31 July elections on the basis of, A, the process and, B, the absence of reforms."

Tsvangirai told a news conference his party will not participate in the new government.

The MDC's rejection of the election results has raised fears of a repeat of bloody violence that followed a disputed vote in 2008.

The international community, meanwhile, has also expressed concerns about the poll.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the United States does not believe the announced results represent a "credible expression of the will of the Zimbabwean people." In a written statement issued Saturday, Kerry said the balance of evidence indicates the announcement was "the culmination of a deeply flawed process." He listed irregularities in the voters roll, unequal media access for each party and the government's failure to implement constitutionally-mandated reforms as some of those flaws.

The European Union said Saturday it was concerned about "alleged irregularities and reports of incomplete participation" in the poll, as well as "identified weaknesses in the electoral process and a lack of transparency."

The African Union declared the election "free and credible," but says it wants more information about the reported irregularities.

Monitors from the Southern African Development Community said that although the vote was "peaceful," it was too early to declare it "fair."

Mugabe opponents say the polling was made fraudulent by alleged voter intimidation and government manipulation of the voter rolls.

The Zimbabwe Election Support Network, which had thousands of vote monitors present, said the election process was compromised because many were blocked from casting ballots.

Amid the allegations, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has urged President Mugabe and Prime Minister Tsvangirai to send what he called "clear messages of calm" to their supporters. He said any election disputes much be handled "transparently and fairly."

The 89-year-old Mugabe and 61-year-old Tsvangirai were the main contestants in the five-candidate presidential race. The elections are expected to end a fragile power-sharing government the two principals were forced to put together in 2009.

That power-sharing deal, spawned by disputes over the 2008 elections, ended the election-related unrest that left 200 of Tsvangirai's supporters dead.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

You May Like

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said To Be Improving

Experimental drugs have been tried on six people: three Westerners and now, three African pyhysicians More

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities residents rebuild their lives, but many say everyone is being treated with suspicion More

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

Girls learn to object; FGM practitioners face penalties from jail sentences to stiff fines More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Chasura from: Matocha
August 03, 2013 6:12 PM
Swallow your pride Mr Tsvangirai, We watched you saying you will announce the results ahead of ZEC putting yourself Above the Law, who would have wanted to vote you in especially those who know Central Government Management and soon after the new constitution making that you also cried foul? Remember maZimbos takadzidza kupfuura most Africans through HE RG Mugabe's hands so we voted him in nomwoyo wose wena. His policies are second to none in this world, Health, Education, Indigenization, Land reform +++


by: Ephrem Getachew from: Addis Ababa
August 03, 2013 3:49 PM
Congratulation!! to Zanu PF and the people of Zimbabwe, Please Mrs. Tsevangaruai accept the result & work with Presid. Mugabe

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improvingi
X
Carol Pearson
August 19, 2014 11:43 PM
The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improving

The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As the Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities from pro-Russian separatists, residents are getting a chance to rebuild their lives. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the town of Kramatorsk in Donetsk province, where a sense of fear is still in the air, and distrust of the government in Kyiv still runs deep.
Video

Video China Targets Overseas Assets of Corrupt Officials

As China presses forward with its anti-graft effort, authorities are targeting corrupt officials who have sent family members and assets overseas. The efforts have stirred up a debate at home on exactly how many officials take that route and how likely it is they will be caught. Rebecca Valli has this report.
Video

Video Leading The Fight Against Islamic State, Kurds Question Iraqi Future

Western countries including the United States have begun arming the Kurdish Peshmerga forces in northern Iraq to aid their battle against extremist Sunni militants from the Islamic State. But there are concerns that a heavily-armed Kurdistan Regional Government, or KRG, might seek to declare independence and cause the break-up of the Iraqi state. As Henry Ridgwell reports from London, the KRG says it will only seek greater autonomy from Baghdad.
Video

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

In some Kenyan communities, female genital mutilation remains a rite of passage. But activists are pushing back, with education for girls and with threats of punishment those who perform the circumcision. Mohammed Yusuf looks at the practice in the rural eastern community of Tharaka-Nithi.
Video

Video For Obama, Racial Violence is Personal Issue

The racial violence in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is presenting U.S. President Barack Obama with an issue to which he has a deep personal connection. To many Americans, Obama's election as America's first black president marked a turning point in race relations in the United States, and Obama has made ending the violence a policy priority. On Monday he issued a new call for calm and understanding. Luis Ramirez reports from the White House.
Video

Video Clinton-Obama Relationship Could Impact 2016 Election

President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have a long and complicated relationship. That relationship took another turn recently when Clinton criticized the president’s foreign policy. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone reports there is renewed attention on the Clinton-Obama relationship as Hillary Clinton considers running for
Video

Video Iran Looks to Maintain Influence in Baghdad With New Shia PM

Washington and Tehran share the goal of stopping Syrian-based militants in Iraq. But experts say it's Iran, not the United States, that will most influence how the new government in Baghdad approaches internal reforms and the war in Syria. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.

AppleAndroid