Middle East

  • Muslims gathered for Friday prayer in central Amman, Jordan, November 16, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • Lead by the Muslim Brotherhood, protesters chanted anti-government slogans, taking on King Abdullah for the first time since the Arab Spring revolutions swept across the Arab world, Amman, Jordan, November 16, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • Jordan has been relatively insulated from the Arab Spring, but on Friday protesters called for the country's King Abdullah to step down, Amman, Jordan, November 16, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • Friday's protests were for the most part peaceful, though there were some skirmishes with Jordan's security forces, Amman, Jordan, November 16, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • At one point, protesters tried to break police lines on Friday but the two groups came to an understanding and the protests remained peaceful, Amman, Jordan, November 16, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)
  • A small group of supporters of King Abdullah and the late King Hussein chanted from a distance at the larger crowd of anti-government protesters, Amman, Jordan, November 16, 2012. (Y. Weeks/VOA)

Jordanian Protests Call for Revolution

Published November 16, 2012

Protesters in Jordan declared Friday a day of rage as anger sparked by a cut in fuel subsidies boiled over into a call for revolution.


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