Asia

    • This photo made available by Queen Elizabeth Hospital shows Malala Yousafzai saying goodbye as she is discharged from the hospital to continue her rehabilitation at her family’s temporary home in the area, January 4, 2013.
    • This photo provided by the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham shows Pakistan's President Asif Ali Zardari, and his daughter Asifa Bhutto, right, meeting with Malala Yousafzai at the hospital, December 8, 2012.
    • This photo issued by Queen Elizabeth Hospital shows Malala Yousafzai with her father Ziauddin, and two younger brothers Atal, right and Khushal, in Birmingham, England.
    • Pakistani school children gather under a poster of injured classmate Malala Yousafzai at the Khushal School for Girls, as they wait to be collected before classes in Mingora, Swat Valley, Pakistan, November 15, 2012.
    • A candle is lit during a vigil for Pakistani girl Malala Yousafzai in Birmingham in central England, October 18, 2012.
    • Students hold pictures of schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, who was shot by the Taliban, during a tribute at the Pakistani Embassy in Abu Dhabi, October 15, 2012.
    • Women hold lighted candles during a rally condemning the attack on schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, in Karachi, Pakistan, October 11, 2012.

    Malala Yousafzai Discharged from Hospital

    Published January 04, 2013

    The Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban for her crusade for the education of girls has been discharged from the British hospital where she was being treated.


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