USA

    • US Vice President Joe Biden and Speaker of the House John Boehner applaud South Korea President Park Geun-hye after she addressed a joint meeting of Congress in Washington, May 8, 2013.
    • South Korea President Park Geun-hye is applauded after she addressed a joint meeting of Congress in Washington, May 8, 2013.
    • President Barack Obama and South Korea President Park Geun-Hye shake hands at the end of a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, May 7, 2013.
    • President Barack Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-Hye meet in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, May 7, 2013.
    • South Korea President Park Geun-Hye meets with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim at Blair House in Washington, May 7, 2013.
    • South Korea President Park Geun-hye is escorted by Maj. Gen. Michael Linnington during a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, May 6, 2013.
    • South Korean President Park Geun-hye lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, May 6, 2013.
    • South Korean President Park Geun-hye prepares to leave after presenting a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, May 6, 2013.
    • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and South Korean President Park Geun-hye pose for a photo with staff members at U.N. headquarters in New York, May 6, 2013.

    South Korean President Park Geun-hye Visits the United States

    Published May 08, 2013


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