Asia

    • Firemen put out fire on the part of a destroyed street as fire continue to burn following multiple explosions from an underground gas leak in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Tossed vehicles line an destroyed street as flames continue to burn from multiple explosions from an underground gas leak in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Flames from an explosion from an underground gas leak in the streets of Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • A woman crosses over a trench made from a massive gas explosion in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Emergency workers survey the damage from a massive gas explosion in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Vehicles are left lie in a destroyed street following multiple explosions from an underground gas leak in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • A rooftop view shows a destroyed street from a massive gas explosion in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Vehicles are left lying on a destroyed street as part of the street is burning with flame following multiple explosions from an underground gas leak in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Locals survey the damage from a massive gas explosion in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.
    • Rescue workers survey the damage from a massive gas explosion in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Aug. 1, 2014.

    Gas Explosions in Kaohsiung, Taiwan - Friday, August 1

    Published July 31, 2014

    A series of powerful gas explosions rocked the southern city of Kaohsiung, Taiwan, late Thursday, according to city officials on Friday.


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