Asia

    • A security guard holds a flag that reads "Please Stop!", as he stands by a steel gate that marks the border between Tamura and Okuma town in Okuma town, Fukushima prefecture, April 1, 2014.
    • Kimiko Koyama, who evacuated from Miyakoji three years ago, looks up inside her house with portraits of her deceased parents in the background, Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, April 1, 2014.
    • Toshio Koyama, who evacuated from Miyakoji three years ago, looks at a damaged silkworm factory near his house after he returned home with his wife Kimiko, Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, April 1, 2014.
    • A man walks between fallow rice fields in Miyakoji in Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, April 1, 2014.
    • A man walks near waste containing radiated soil, leaves and debris from the decontamination operation at a storage site at Miyakoji area in Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, April 1, 2014.

    Japan Allows Some to Return to Homes near Fukushima

    Published April 01, 2014

    Japan has allowed more than 300 residents to return to a small area near the Fukushima nuclear power plant for the first time since a tsunami hit in 2011.


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