Middle East

    • Damage is seen in the front yard of a building at the U.S. Embassy compound in Tripoli, Libya, after weeks of violence between rival militias over control of the capital, in this photo taken during a tour offered to onlookers and journalists by the Dawn o
    • A view of an annex of the U.S. embassy in Tripoli during a media tour organized by the Dawn of Libya militant group after the group took over the annex, Aug. 31, 2014.
    • A view of an annex of the U.S. embassy in Tripoli during a media tour organized by the Dawn of Libya, a group of Islamist-leaning forces mainly from Misrata, after the group took over the annex, Aug. 31, 2014.
    • A view of a dining room at an annex of the U.S. embassy in Tripoli, Libya, Aug. 31, 2014.
    • A member of the Dawn of Libya Islamist militia stands at the gym of a villa at the U.S. diplomatic compound after members of the group moved into the complex of several villas in southern Tripoli to prevent it from being looted, Aug. 31, 2014.

    Libyan Militia Group Moves Into US Embassy Annex in Tripoli

    Published September 01, 2014

    The Dawn of Libya, the Islamist-allied militia group in control of Libya's capital, has moved into the U.S. Embassy annex and its residential compound, a commander said Sunday, as onlookers and journalists toured the abandoned homes of diplomats who fled the country more than a month ago.


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