Africa

  • These four female students of government secondary school were abducted by gunmen, then escaped their captors and reunited with their families, in Chibok, Nigeria, April, 21, 2014. (Anne Look/VOA)
  • An entourage of Chibok's governor, the local education commissioner (holding microphone), armed security and townspeople walk toward the site of the burned out government secondary school, Chibok, Nigeria, April 21, 2014. (Anne Look/VOA)
  • The governor of Chibok (in rose-colored clothing), the local education commissioner (fourth from left) with armed security and townspeople inspect the government secondary school that was set on fire after the more than 200 girls were abducted by gunmen, Chibok, Niger, April 21, 2014. (Anne Look/VOA)
  • The governor of Chibok (2nd from left) listens while the local education commissioner (far right) recounts the kidnapping of the more than 200 girls from the government secondary school and the subsequent burning of the school, Chibok, Nigeria, April 21, 2014. (Anne Look/VOA)
  • An entourage of Chibok's governor, the local education commissioner, armed security and townspeople walk to the site of the burned out government secondary school, Chibok, Nigeria, April 21, 2014. (Anne Look/VOA)

Parents Say 234 Girls Captured from Nigerian School

Published April 23, 2014

The parents of Nigerian schoolgirls who were abducted last week by Islamist extremists say 234 girls are still missing, a much higher figure than authorities have given.


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