Africa

    • Dirk van Tonder of South Africa admires a freshly poured ‘African pale ale’ that he brewed using a hop so new it is only known as the J-17-63 hop. (VOA/Darren Taylor)
    • The small conical-shaped flower of the humulus lupulus plant is the hops that gives beer its bitterness and flavor (photo courtesy South African Breweries)
    • Moritz Kallmeyer (left) likes the balanced fruity flavor of beers brewed with South Africa's new J-17-63 hops that were available at a craft beer festival (photo courtesy Drayman’s Brewery)
    • A South African Brewery employee sorts mounds of hops in preparation for brewing some of the nation's popular standard labels. (photo courtesy South African Breweries)
    • South African brewer Dirk van Tonder tests South Africa’s newest hop with two of his signature beers, a German-style weiss, left, and a pale ale in the foreground (VOA/Darren Taylor).
    • South African Breweries generally uses less flavorful hops to make beers such as the popular Castle Lager (photo courtesy South African Breweries)
    • At South African Breweries facility in Alrode near Johannesburg, a packer prepares stacks of bags of hops for shipping. (VOA/Darren Taylor)

    South Africa Hop Launches New Beer Flavor

    Darren Taylor

    Published November 15, 2013


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