Health

    Scientists Explore Gut Microbes Reaction to Diseasei
    X
    March 06, 2013 10:28 PM
    The human body contains roughly 10 trillion human cells . . . and harbors 100 trillion microbes - naturally-occurring bacteria that can be helpful, even essential to our health. Taken together, all these microscopic residents comprise what’s called the human microbiome. To expand our knowledge of this complex symbiosis, a new “citizen science” project has reached out for public funding . . . and microbial samples, too, from thousands of people, from all walks of life, from around the world. From Boulder Colorado, Shelley Schlender reports about the American Gut Project.

    Scientists Explore Gut Microbes Reaction to Disease

    Published March 06, 2013

    The human body contains roughly 10 trillion human cells . . . and harbors 100 trillion microbes - naturally-occurring bacteria that can be helpful, even essential to our health. Taken together, all these microscopic residents comprise what’s called the human microbiome. To expand our knowledge of this complex symbiosis, a new “citizen science” project has reached out for public funding . . . and microbial samples, too, from thousands of people, from all walks of life, from around the world. From Boulder Colorado, Shelley Schlender reports about the American Gut Project.


    You May Like

    Escalation of Media Crackdown in Turkey Heightens Concerns

    Critics see 'a new dark age' as arrests of journalists, closures of media outlets by Erdogan government mount

    Russia Boasts of Troop Buildup on Flank, Draws Flak

    Russian military moves counter to efforts to de-escalate tensions, State Department says

    What Take-out Food Reveals About American History

    From fast-food restaurants to pizza delivery, here's what the history of take-out food tells us about changes in American society