Science & Technology

After Higgs Hunt, Fermilab Charts New Paths in Physics Researchi
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March 22, 2013 9:05 PM
Scientists in Switzerland announced earlier this month [March 14] that they are confident their experiments with the world's most powerful atom smasher have finally turned up the long-sought Higgs boson, also known as the “God Particle.” Discovery of the elusive sub-atomic particle, which scientists believe imparts mass to all matter, also provides tantalizing clues to some of the most profound mysteries of the universe. The search for Higgs began decades ago at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in suburban Chicago, Illinois. And as VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, scientists there are developing new technologies to delve even deeper into the mysteries of particle physics.

After Higgs Hunt, Fermilab Charts New Paths in Physics Research

Published March 22, 2013

Scientists in Switzerland announced earlier this month [March 14] that they are confident their experiments with the world's most powerful atom smasher have finally turned up the long-sought Higgs boson, also known as the “God Particle.” Discovery of the elusive sub-atomic particle, which scientists believe imparts mass to all matter, also provides tantalizing clues to some of the most profound mysteries of the universe. The search for Higgs began decades ago at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in suburban Chicago, Illinois. And as VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, scientists there are developing new technologies to delve even deeper into the mysteries of particle physics.


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