USA

    Obama Defends Secret Surveillance Programsi
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    June 08, 2013 3:06 AM
    The Guardian newspaper reported late Friday that U.S. President Barack Obama has ordered various government agencies to prepare for offensive cyberwarfare operations, including drawing up a list of potential overseas targets for U.S. cyber-attacks. It is the third secret U.S. security document to be published by The Guardian in 48 hours. Earlier Friday, Obama offered a spirited defense of secret administration surveillance policies aimed at stopping terrorist attacks. The president was responding to the news reports about programs that secretly scan through phone records and Internet activity that have outraged privacy advocates. VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has more.

    Obama Defends Secret Surveillance Programs

    Published June 07, 2013

    The Guardian newspaper reported late Friday that U.S. President Barack Obama has ordered various government agencies to prepare for offensive cyberwarfare operations, including drawing up a list of potential overseas targets for U.S. cyber-attacks. It is the third secret U.S. security document to be published by The Guardian in 48 hours. Earlier Friday, Obama offered a spirited defense of secret administration surveillance policies aimed at stopping terrorist attacks. The president was responding to the news reports about programs that secretly scan through phone records and Internet activity that have outraged privacy advocates. VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has more.


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