Africa

Some Aid Programs in Sahel Prefer Cash to Foodi
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June 18, 2013 7:39 PM
Humanitarian agencies in Africa's Sahel region are struggling to deal with a cycle of chronic food crisis. Some are moving away from traditional food aid in favor of "cash for work" programs that pay villagers to work on community improvement projects. The U.S. government is considering shifting as much as 45 percent of its $1.4 billion of traditional food aid in this direction. Nick Loomis has this report from the Diourbel region of Senegal, where one such program, funded by the USAID Food for Peace Initiative, has been underway for the past seven months.

Some Aid Programs in Sahel Prefer Cash to Food

Published June 18, 2013

Humanitarian agencies in Africa's Sahel region are struggling to deal with a cycle of chronic food crisis. Some are moving away from traditional food aid in favor of "cash for work" programs that pay villagers to work on community improvement projects. The U.S. government is considering shifting as much as 45 percent of its $1.4 billion of traditional food aid in this direction. Nick Loomis has this report from the Diourbel region of Senegal, where one such program, funded by the USAID Food for Peace Initiative, has been underway for the past seven months.


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