Asia

Relief Radio Station Signals Dire State of Communications in Taclobani
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November 23, 2013 4:37 AM
All of Tacloban’s 15 radio stations were knocked off the air when Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippine city of 220,000 people. A response within 72 hours by volunteers managed to get an emergency station on the air - the only local mass means for the survivors there to get instant, reliable information. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman in Tacloban has the story.

Relief Radio Station Signals Dire State of Communications in Tacloban

Published November 22, 2013

All of Tacloban’s 15 radio stations were knocked off the air when Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippine city of 220,000 people. A response within 72 hours by volunteers managed to get an emergency station on the air - the only local mass means for the survivors there to get instant, reliable information. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman in Tacloban has the story.


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