Arts & Entertainment

    Looking Back: Beatles Take US by Stormi
    X
    February 11, 2014 9:09 PM
    This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ first appearances in the United States, and the beginning of the U.S. version of “Beatlemania.” When the Beatles touched down in New York on February 7, 1964 few knew that American music and culture would change forever. The Beatles arrived in a country still mourning the loss of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated just months before. Americans were ready for something that would lighten the somber mood. The Beatles delivered some levity and joy. The Beatles had come to America to perform on the Ed Sullivan TV show, and more than 70 million people tuned in. It was then the largest TV audience ever for an entertainment show. Laurel Bowman takes a look back.

    Looking Back: Beatles Take US by Storm

    Published February 11, 2014

    This week marks the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ first appearances in the United States, and the beginning of the U.S. version of “Beatlemania.” When the Beatles touched down in New York on February 7, 1964 few knew that American music and culture would change forever. The Beatles arrived in a country still mourning the loss of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated just months before. Americans were ready for something that would lighten the somber mood. The Beatles delivered some levity and joy. The Beatles had come to America to perform on the Ed Sullivan TV show, and more than 70 million people tuned in. It was then the largest TV audience ever for an entertainment show. Laurel Bowman takes a look back.


    You May Like

    Russian-Backed Offensive in Syria Pushes War to Tipping Point

    As threat to Aleppo and rebel forces grows, US plan to negotiate becomes less and less appealing for Syrian government, says one military analyst

    IS Runs Timber Smuggling Business in Afghanistan, Officials Say

    Government turning blind eye to smuggling, according to tribal leaders; Afghanistan's forest cover dropped by 50 percent in three decades, experts say

    Video White House Seeks $1.8 Billion to Combat Zika

    Obama administration says funding would 'support essential strategies to combat the virus' such as rapidly expanding mosquito control programs, accelerating vaccine research