Arts & Entertainment

Hollywood Visual Effects Go Globali
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Elizabeth Lee
April 22, 2014 10:02 PM
Many of today’s Hollywood blockbuster movies include stunning visual effects. Most of those effects used to be produced in Hollywood, but that has changed. Now, one film can include visual effects produced in many different countries. Elizabeth Lee reports from Los Angeles on how the globalization of visual effects is affecting artists in Hollywood and around the world.

Hollywood Visual Effects Go Global

Elizabeth Lee

Published April 22, 2014

Many of today’s Hollywood blockbuster movies include stunning visual effects. Most of those effects used to be produced in Hollywood, but that has changed. Now, one film can include visual effects produced in many different countries. Elizabeth Lee reports from Los Angeles on how the globalization of visual effects is affecting artists in Hollywood and around the world.


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by: Ace from: LA
April 25, 2014 4:24 AM
Dave -

I think you misunderstood Mr. Roddam. I think he was agreeing with you, that work should be opened up to an even playing field. Because he knows if subsidies go away, he will win more work in India cause the Producers chasing subsidies will then chase lower wages and he can win that race to the bottom. And he colonizes a base in LA for client relations and hires a few dozen people there to present a friendly face to the producers. People like me.

He believes what I believe. CVD or not, the world is evolving and rightly or wrongly guys like you are being left behind.


by: David Rand from: Hollywood, Ca
April 22, 2014 10:04 PM
In regards to Venkatesh Roddam's comment on countervailing damaging subsidies:

"...it's not a very progressive idea, you're artificially pumping up the cost, you're limiting talent availability..."

Sorry sir, subsidies have artificially disrupted a creative economy by basing it on government handouts instead of talent and branding.

This keeps film making dependent on one area of the world dramatically stunts true growth and innovation globally as talent races around the planet leaving a wake of bankrupt companies The collaborative work wiped away like sand paintings while they all race to the bottom.

Market socialism is not the answer. Renting is not owning. When industries are taken by governments, not talent, and taken by breaking the very trade agreement all leading nations signed in order to prevent these artificial imbalances, the market becomes damaged. Google World Trade Agreement Prohibited Subsidies.

In visual effects, I believe that the money gained through subsidies is lost by the destructive nature of our race to the bottom and the sterile replacement of human space with cyberspace. A new meaning to "Net Loss". You won't find films made this way in the top percentage of real money makers.

If a New Zealand company can make Avatar while Cameron walks among them in person That is truly fantastic....then have it go on to gross 4 billion dollars, even better...so why do they need that small government's handout? Handouts that have nothing to do with taxes and little to do with real incentives or real growth.

If another country offers more handouts the collected group of international artist have to pack it up again and move while what they thought was again their new home and industry location....evaporates...not a very creative space to be in, not at all. It's short sighted and robs the very bottom line the controlling studios wish to "enhance". Even they lose. We all lose.