Science & Technology

    Eagerly-awaited Technology Transforms Garbage into Fueli
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    Steve Baragona
    May 19, 2014 1:07 PM
    Several companies plan to turn garbage, corn stalks and wheat straw into ethanol biofuel that can power vehicles, in a development that lends credence to the old adage, "one person's trash is another's treasure." It's one of the most eagerly awaited technologies in alternative fuel and is expected to break into the mainstream this year. VOA's Steve Baragona reports. The biofuel is known as cellulosic ethanol, and if successful, supporters say it could provide an abundant source of energy while quieting critics who say the growth of the biofuel business has put a strain on food prices and the environment. VOA's Steve Baragona reports.

    Eagerly-awaited Technology Transforms Garbage into Fuel

    Published May 19, 2014

    Several companies plan to turn garbage, corn stalks and wheat straw into ethanol biofuel that can power vehicles, in a development that lends credence to the old adage, "one person's trash is another's treasure." It's one of the most eagerly awaited technologies in alternative fuel and is expected to break into the mainstream this year. VOA's Steve Baragona reports. The biofuel is known as cellulosic ethanol, and if successful, supporters say it could provide an abundant source of energy while quieting critics who say the growth of the biofuel business has put a strain on food prices and the environment. VOA's Steve Baragona reports.


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