Science & Technology

    Strangest, Coldest, Hottest, Fastest, Rarest Sea Creaturesi
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    Rosanne Skirble
    August 13, 2014 9:23 PM
    Oceans cover two-thirds of our planet. While they appear to harbor an inexhaustible supply of food, humans have overfished and polluted them with climate changing gases that make the waters acidic and less productive. This is the underlying theme that runs through a new book by a scientist and his novelist son called The Extreme Life of the Sea. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble caught up with them at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington.

    Strangest, Coldest, Hottest, Fastest, Rarest Sea Creatures

    Rosanne Skirble

    Published August 13, 2014

    Oceans cover two-thirds of our planet. While they appear to harbor an inexhaustible supply of food, humans have overfished and polluted them with climate changing gases that make the waters acidic and less productive. This is the underlying theme that runs through a new book by a scientist and his novelist son called The Extreme Life of the Sea. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble caught up with them at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington.


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