Africa

    West Africa Ebola Vaccine Trials Possible by Early 2015i
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    Carol Pearson
    August 30, 2014 7:14 PM
    A U.S. health agency is speeding up clinical trials of a possible vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus that so far has killed more than 1,500 people in West Africa. If successful, the next step would be a larger trial in countries where the outbreak is occurring. VOA's Carol Pearson has more.

    West Africa Ebola Vaccine Trials Possible by Early 2015

    Carol Pearson

    Published August 30, 2014

    A U.S. health agency is speeding up clinical trials of a possible vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus that so far has killed more than 1,500 people in West Africa. If successful, the next step would be a larger trial in countries where the outbreak is occurring. VOA's Carol Pearson has more.


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    by: Joan Camara
    September 02, 2014 10:31 AM
    Yeah ok, the two supposedly ebola patients that came to Georgia, in the US, just so happened to come up "cured",... but the people in Africa have to wait to 2015....How mad am I? Don't ask.

    by: Anonymous
    September 01, 2014 8:44 AM
    Fauci is of course correct. To make a vaccine that provides long term protection, is affordable, and is safe for humans is very difficult. Since even the US hospital system would start to buckle under the strain if it had to deal with, say, 100 000 people in isolation pods, breathing filtered air and attended by carers in space suits, it's worth insuring against the very low probability that this situation might arise. But as he implies, this is really preparation for the next epidemic.