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India’s Leprosy Battle Stymied by Continuing Stigmai
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Shaikh Azizur Rahman
August 27, 2014 2:48 PM
Medical advancements in the treatment of leprosy have greatly diminished its impact around the world, largely eliminating the disease from most countries. India made great strides in combating leprosy, but still accounts for a majority of the world’s new cases each year, and the number of newly infected Indians is rising - more than 130,000 recorded last year. Doctors there say the problem has more to do with society than science. Shaikh Azizur Rahman reports from Kolkata.

India’s Leprosy Battle Stymied by Continuing Stigma

Shaikh Azizur Rahman

Published August 27, 2014

Medical advancements in the treatment of leprosy have greatly diminished its impact around the world, largely eliminating the disease from most countries. India made great strides in combating leprosy, but still accounts for a majority of the world’s new cases each year, and the number of newly infected Indians is rising - more than 130,000 recorded last year. Doctors there say the problem has more to do with society than science. Shaikh Azizur Rahman reports from Kolkata.


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by: Arindam Bose from: New Delhi
August 28, 2014 3:19 PM
This figure of 130,000 new patients is certainly not covering those who sought treatment at private clinics. Many private clinics never submit any data on new patients received to any nodal body.

Also, there are many who don't bother with a small sensation-less patch on their skin and don't happen to go to a qualified doctor unless any limb is disfigured which often takes years.

I am dead sure that there are tens of thousands of hidden leprosy cases in India and this figure of 130,000 is definitely much less than the reality.



Many secretly get treatment from private