Asia

India’s Leprosy Battle Stymied by Continuing Stigmai
X
Shaikh Azizur Rahman
August 27, 2014 2:48 PM
Medical advancements in the treatment of leprosy have greatly diminished its impact around the world, largely eliminating the disease from most countries. India made great strides in combating leprosy, but still accounts for a majority of the world’s new cases each year, and the number of newly infected Indians is rising - more than 130,000 recorded last year. Doctors there say the problem has more to do with society than science. Shaikh Azizur Rahman reports from Kolkata.

India’s Leprosy Battle Stymied by Continuing Stigma

Shaikh Azizur Rahman

Published August 27, 2014

Medical advancements in the treatment of leprosy have greatly diminished its impact around the world, largely eliminating the disease from most countries. India made great strides in combating leprosy, but still accounts for a majority of the world’s new cases each year, and the number of newly infected Indians is rising - more than 130,000 recorded last year. Doctors there say the problem has more to do with society than science. Shaikh Azizur Rahman reports from Kolkata.


You May Like

HRW: Egypt's Trial of Morsi ‘Badly Flawed’

Human Rights Watch says former Egypt leader's detention without charge for more than three weeks after his removal from office violated Egyptian law; government rejects criticism More

Photogallery Lancet Report Calls for Major Investment in Surgery

In its report published by The Lancet, panel of experts says people are dying from conditions easily treated in the operating room such as hernia, appendicitis, obstructed labor, and serious fractures More

Music Industry Under Sway of Digital Revolution

Millions of people in every corner of the Earth now can enjoy a vast variety and quantity of music in a way that has never before been possible More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Arindam Bose from: New Delhi
August 28, 2014 3:19 PM
This figure of 130,000 new patients is certainly not covering those who sought treatment at private clinics. Many private clinics never submit any data on new patients received to any nodal body.

Also, there are many who don't bother with a small sensation-less patch on their skin and don't happen to go to a qualified doctor unless any limb is disfigured which often takes years.

I am dead sure that there are tens of thousands of hidden leprosy cases in India and this figure of 130,000 is definitely much less than the reality.



Many secretly get treatment from private