Health

Research Suggests Gut Microbes Impact Autismi
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Shelley Schlender
July 08, 2014 3:49 PM
New research suggests children with autism tend to have a less diverse population of gut microbes than other children. Scientists suspect modern practices, including eating processed foods and overuse of antibiotics, are feeding the problem. Shelly Schlender reports from Boulder, Colorado.

Research Suggests Gut Microbes Impact Autism

Shelley Schlender

Published July 08, 2014

New research suggests children with autism tend to have a less diverse population of gut microbes than other children. Scientists suspect modern practices, including eating processed foods and overuse of antibiotics, are feeding the problem. Shelly Schlender reports from Boulder, Colorado.


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