Asia

Thailand Takes Steps to Combat Migrant Labor Exploitationi
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Steve Herman
June 30, 2014 2:44 PM
Thai army officials acknowledge that corruption, as well as a lack of enforcing laws against human trafficking, have led the kingdom to be branded as one of the worst offenders for forced or exploited labor. As the country tries to clean up its image and keep workers valuable to its economy, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Samut Sakhon where authorities are establishing “one stop” centers for registering migrant workers.

Thailand Takes Steps to Combat Migrant Labor Exploitation

Published June 30, 2014

Thai army officials acknowledge that corruption, as well as a lack of enforcing laws against human trafficking, have led the kingdom to be branded as one of the worst offenders for forced or exploited labor. As the country tries to clean up its image and keep workers valuable to its economy, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Samut Sakhon where authorities are establishing “one stop” centers for registering migrant workers.


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