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Presidential Commission Warns of Cyber Threats Facing Next Administration

  • VOA News

FILE - A cyber warfare expert holds a notebook computer while posing for a portrait in Charlotte.

A U.S. presidential commission on Friday called on the incoming administration to immediately take steps to enhance cybersecurity in both the private and public sector.

The Commission on Enhancing National Cyber Security, which includes 12 non-partisan experts in technology and computer security, presented a report to U.S. President Barack Obama with several recommendations it hopes to have implemented within the next two to five years.

Those recommendations include the creation of two new positions within U.S. President-elect Donald Trump’s incoming administration, an assistant to the president for cyber security and an ambassador for cyber security, who would work with officials in other countries to strengthen international security.

The commission called on the Trump administration to train 100,000 new cyber security workers by 2020 and wants to end identity theft by doing away with traditional passwords by 2021.

The commission also urged more government action when assuming responsibility for internet security to take the burden off individual internet users who may try and stay secure on the internet, but still become victims in elaborate hacking schemes.

Obama, in a statement, urged both Trump and Congress to use the recommendations “as a guide” going forward, though it is not immediately clear whether Trump will heed the advice.

Trump has already made several promises to boost online security under his administration, including the creation of a “cyber review team” made up of military, civilian and private digital experts who would work with each federal agency to bolster security.

According to Trump, the team would work to update “the most sensitive systems” first, and then get to the others in order of importance.

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