News / Africa

Angelina Jolie, British FM, Vow to Take Action Against Sexual Violence

Actress and special envoy of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Angelina Jolie, and British Foreign Secretary William Hague make their opening speeches at a global summit to end sexual violence in conflict in London, June 10, 2014.
Actress and special envoy of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Angelina Jolie, and British Foreign Secretary William Hague make their opening speeches at a global summit to end sexual violence in conflict in London, June 10, 2014.
Reuters
Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie and British Foreign Secretary William Hague vowed on Tuesday to produce practical action from the world's first summit on ending sexual violence in conflict to punish those responsible and help victims.

Up to 1,200 government ministers, military and judicial officials and activists from about 150 nations will attend the June 10-13 summit that is a call for action to protect women, children and men from rape and sex attacks in war zones.

The high-profile meeting in London follows a series of violent incidents against women expected to raise pressure for action, including the kidnap of some 200 Nigerian schoolgirls, the stoning of a pregnant Pakistani woman to death, and the gang-rape and murder of two Indian girls.

On the first day of the summit Tuesday, Hague unveiled a six million pound ($10 million) fund for victims from the British government.

 
Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict
 
  • Includes 113 countries and more than 100 organizations
  • Aims to launch a new protocol to document and investigate sexual violence in conflict zones to improve conviction rates
  • Calls for soldiers and peacekeepers to be trained in preventing sexual violence
  • Calls for countries to provide funds for support for survivors of sexual violence
  • Aims to debunk attitude that rape in war is inevitable or a lesser crime
     
Source: British Government
Jolie, a special envoy of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), said political will was needed globally to treat sexual violence as a priority and tackle a culture of impunity.

The popular U.S. actress' involvement in humanitarian issues dates back to 2001 when she travelled to Sierra Leone as a UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador and saw the impact of years of civil war when an estimated 60,000 women were raped.

Hague became involved in Jolie's campaign against sexual violence in war zones after seeing the actress's 2011 directorial debut "In the Land of Blood and Honey" that was set against the backdrop of the 1992-95 Bosnian war in which more than 100,000 people were killed and an estimated 20,000 women believed raped.

Last year the unusual partnership led to the launch of a declaration, now signed by about 150 countries, pledging to end impunity and provide justice and safety for victims but Hague said the summit would take this further.

Jolie and British fashion designer Stella McCartney wrapped up the day by launching UK charity War Child's 'Draw Me to Safety' campaign, which aims to highlight the plight of children living in war zones.

Participants of the summit are expected to agree on the first international protocol on how to document and investigate sexual violence in conflict.

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by: Bill
June 12, 2014 10:20 AM
A commendable cause but importantly what of genocide in Africa. The ICC at the Hague has failed to bring those responsible for the deaths of its citizens to justice and Governments worldwide continue to do business with these countries. Hypocrisy at its worst.


by: Justiceday from: USA
June 12, 2014 9:57 AM
The US has the worst problem with rape yet finger point at other countries. The US military rapes more people worldwide than any group including US civilians. When you have a military that controls the world how do u plan to stop rape without stopping them.
www theusmarinesrape com


by: Robert John Moreno from: United States
June 11, 2014 12:15 PM
7 billion people you have now, 10 billion by 2050, if we don't control are numbers God will. Why didn't the u.n. announce stop population for all humans for 7 years, and why was I not there !


by: marika from: catania
June 11, 2014 10:43 AM
A deep experience, without limits and conditioning in order to fight and denounce the violence against women. Brave, global and unprecedented as usual: that's the new MAI PIU' DEBOLI directed by Mr OM. The first telematic flash mob where there's no need to share something forced but to have instead an active role as a protagonist. It begins with a deafening global silence on the web, without photos, states or comments. Only a huge space to 'listen' each others and let the thoughts flow toward the International Day to cancel the Violence against Women.

When the silence finishes, the extraordinary flash mob will burst out. In a second all the facebook walls will get coloured simultaneously, each one with its own way thanks to the silence they have heard!!! A silent person is a little thing. Millions of silent persons are an uncontainable shout.Don't forget the date : November 25th from 20.00 UMT+1



by: arb from: usa
June 11, 2014 10:38 AM
Surely noble intentions, question is how much of her views are getting influenced by her personal life. I am actually very sceptical of celebrities who generally have a troubled private life style asking others to follow right path.

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