News / Middle East

At Least 51 Killed in Egypt as Tensions Soar

Video of Muslim Brotherhood supporters and military backersi
X
July 08, 2013 3:02 PM
Egypt's military and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi are waging a war of words, blaming each other for a clash that killed at least 51 people and injured hundreds of others.
Video of Muslim Brotherhood supporters and military backers
VOA News
Egypt's military and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi are waging a war of words, blaming each other for a clash that killed at least 51 people and injured hundreds of others.

Witnesses said the streets near the Republican Guard headquarters filled with tear gas and shots rang out as Morsi supporters staged a protest early Monday. Muslim Brotherhood officials charged the army opened fire without provocation. Military officials accused terrorist groups of trying to storm the building.

Interim Egyptian President Adly Mansour called for restraint and ordered a judicial investigation, but the incident has further frayed efforts to form a transitional government. The ultra-conservative Salafi Nour Party says it is withdrawing from talks to form a new government, citing what it called a massacre.  

Pro-reform leader and former Nobel Peace Prize winner Mohamed ElBaradei took to Twitter to condemn the violence, but also said "peaceful transition is the only way."

The Muslim Brotherhood called for an "uprising" against what it says are those "who want to steal the revolution with tanks."
 
  • Supporters of Egypt's deposed President Mohamed Morsi carry the body of a fellow supporter killed outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • A wounded supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi lies at a private hospital in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi attend a protest outside a military building where he is belived to be detained in Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi march to the Republican Guards headquarters where they believe he is being held by the army, Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Muslim Brotherhood leader Asem Abd-ElMaged delivers a speech to supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, July 7, 2013.
  • Thousands poured into Tahrir Square to celebrate what they are calling Egypt's "Second Revolution", the military's ouster of president Mohamed Morsi, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A man in Tahrir Square holds a sticker saying "No To Terrorism" in reference to the Muslim Brotherhood, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A man in Tahrir Square writes on a poster "History Will Never Forget Obama," July 7, 2013 (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Many of those who rallied in Tahrir Square brought their families and children, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Protests against ousted president Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood supporters have generated high sales for all sorts of nationalist souvenirs, from flags to T-shirts, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi clash with anti-Morsi protesters in Alexandria, July 7, 2013.

After the incident. VOA's Sharon Behn visited one of the field hospitals run by the Muslim Brotherhood in Cairo's Nasr City.

"The scene here is quite chaotic. They say that many wounded have been brought in here and that they were shot by the Egyptian military while they were at there prayers," said Behn. "We have seen people with bullet wounds to the head and one with a pretty severe bullet wound to his side. He said they were shot while they were at prayers and that he saw one three-month-old actually get killed right in front of him."

Erupting violence

Mohamed Amer was one of the injured brought to that hospital and he spoke to VOA.

“We were praying in the square in front of the Republican Guards, we start praying at 2:15 a.m. until dawn, while we were kneeling we heard our security people calling for help," said Amer. "The imam finished the prayer quickly and then we heard the loud sound of tear gas cannisters, and the sound of bullets. We found the bullet shells later, and two live rounds, and they attacked us from the right and the left.”

Military officials continue to argue that Morsi-supporters ignited the violence, releasing video to state-run TV which claims to show protesters throwing rocks before one man steps forward and appears to fire a gun.

Mohamad Ibraheem said he was one of the soldiers injured during the fighting.

"We were there to ensure the safety of the people. When we were there, they started firing at us and throwing Molotov cocktails and bricks," said Ibraheem. "Many of my colleagues were hit by the fire, and the proof is here at the hospital. I was standing in the middle trying to calm things down and someone came and stabbed me with a piece of metal in my waist, after that I did not feel a thing.''

Republican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, EgyptRepublican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, Egypt
x
Republican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, Egypt
Republican Guard Headquarters, Cairo, Egypt
Establishing new government

Egypt's interim leaders have been struggling to put together a new government acceptable to both backers and opponents of Morsi.

The political standoff between the secular and liberal-dominated transitional government and hardline Islamist lawmakers intensified on Saturday, after interim President Adly Mansour's office - under pressure from Islamists - backtracked on a decision to appoint Mohamed ElBaradei as Egypt’s interim prime minister.

The transitional prime minister will have sweeping powers to govern, while the president is expected to be a largely symbolic post.

In Washington, President Barack Obama voiced renewed concern about the political upheaval, while reiterating the United States is not aligned with and does not support any particular Egyptian political party or group.

The army described Morsi's removal as necessary to enforce the will of millions of people who have repeatedly demanded his resignation.

You May Like

French Refugee Drama Wins Cannes Top Prize

Dheepan is about a group of Sri Lankan refugees who pretend to be a family in order to flee their war-torn country for a housing project in France More

Photogallery Crisis in Macedonia Requires Meaningful and Swift Measures

The international community has called on Macedonian leadership to take concrete measures in support of democracy in order to exit the crisis More

Activists: IS Executes 217 Civilians, Soldiers Near Palmyra

British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights on Sunday said the victims include nurses, women, children and Syrian government fighters More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: ali baba from: new york
July 08, 2013 9:54 AM
if they are demonstrate peacefully ,no body is killed. .the fact that they are violent and use force to attack military building .the military action is appropriate and it is jusfied

by: nik from: US
July 08, 2013 9:43 AM
The army took Egypt back into the dark ages when it ruled and ripped off the nation for 50 years with Hosni Mubarak. People supporting the army are not for freedom but they just want to impose their will even as the army kills Egyptians. A very sad turn of events for Egypt as a nation.
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
July 09, 2013 2:16 AM
the dark age in Egypt when it was ruled by Muslim brotherhood.

by: Michael from: USA
July 08, 2013 9:07 AM
The Egyptian military has inside access to the Pentagon. If supporters of Morsi call for uprisings against the military, the Pentagon would know alot about those type of plans. The Nour party would be watched for how it is going to plan it's activity in the next few days. The economic crisis could slow violence as many would be working to gather basic goods. Hopefully, the interim leaders can weather the storm. The American flag should be on display to show the connection between democracy and civic ritual

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthroughi
X
May 22, 2015 10:23 AM
Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthrough

Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Europe Follows US Lead in Tackling ‘Conflict Minerals’

Metals mined from conflict zones in places like the Democratic Republic of Congo are often sold by warlords to buy weapons. This week European lawmakers voted to force manufacturers to prove that their supply chains are not inadvertently fueling conflicts and human rights abuses. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Class Tackles Questions of Race, Discrimination

Unrest in some U.S. cities is more than just a trending news item at Ladue Middle School in St. Louis, Missouri. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, it’s a focus of a multicultural studies class engaging students in wide-ranging discussions about racial tensions and police aggression.
Video

Video Mind-Controlled Prosthetics Are Getting Closer

Scientists and engineers are making substantial advances towards the ultimate goal in prosthetics – creation of limbs that can be controlled by the wearer’s mind. Thanks to sophisticated sensors capable of picking up the brain’s signals, an amputee in Iceland is literally bringing us one step closer to that goal. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Afghan Economy Sinks As Foreign Troops Depart

As international troops prepare to leave Afghanistan, and many foreign aid groups follow, Afghans are grappling with how the exodus will affect the country's fragile economy. Ayesha Tanzeem reports from the Afghan capital, Kabul.
Video

Video Poverty, Ignorance Force Underage Girls Into Marriage

The recent marriage of a 17-year old Chechen girl to a local police chief who was 30 years older and already had a wife caused an outcry in Russia and beyond. The bride was reportedly forced to marry and her parents were intimidated into giving their consent. The union spotlighted yet again the plight of many underage girls in developing countries. Zlatica Hoke reports poverty, ignorance and fear are behind the practice, especially in Asia and Africa.
Video

Video South Korea Marks Gwangju Uprising Anniversary

South Korea this week marked the 35th anniversary of a protest that turned deadly. The Gwangju Uprising is credited with starting the country’s democratic revolution after it was violently quelled by South Korea’s former military rulers. But as Jason Strother reports, some observers worry that democracy has recently been eroded.
Video

Video California’s Water System Not Created To Handle Current Drought

The drought in California is moving into its fourth year. While the state's governor is mandating a reduction in urban water use, most of the water used in California is for agriculture. But both city dwellers and farmers are feeling the impact of the drought. Some experts say the state’s water system was not created to handle long periods of drought. Elizabeth Lee reports from Ventura County, an agricultural region just northwest of Los Angeles.
Video

Video How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction

An international team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of the woolly mammoth. Led by the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, the work opens the door to recreate the huge herbivore, which last roamed the Earth 4,000 years ago. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble considers the science of de-extinction and its place on the planet
Video

Video Blind Boy Defines His Life with Music

Cole Moran was born blind. He also has cognitive delays and other birth defects. He has to learn everything by ear. Nevertheless, the 12-year-old has had an insatiable love for music since he was born. VOA’s June Soh introduces us to the young phenomenal harmonica player.

VOA Blogs