News / Africa

Bashir Says No Support for Rebels in South Sudan

South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, left, meets with Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir, right, in the capital Juba, South Sudan, Jan. 6, 2014.
South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, left, meets with Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir, right, in the capital Juba, South Sudan, Jan. 6, 2014.
VOA News
Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir is pledging his government will not support rebels in neighboring South Sudan.

The Sudanese leader spoke Monday during a brief visit to the southern capital, Juba, where he met with South Sudan President Salva Kiir.

Bashir thanked Kiir for a "warm welcome" and went on to say Sudan will never support rebels against any neighboring government.  He said that "would only cause instability, exhaustion of resources and destruction of ties between countries."

In the past, the two Sudans have accused each other of supporting rebels on the other's territory.

Meanwhile, substantive peace talks between delegates for Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar appear finally set to begin in Ethiopia.

The sides negotiated for several days over the format and agenda of the talks.  The chairman of the mediation team, Seyoum Mesfin, told reporters Monday the parties have agreed to discuss a proposed cease-fire, and the fate of pro-rebel officials detained by the government.

China is calling for an immediate end to hostilities in South Sudan, where three weeks of political and ethnic violence has killed more than 1,000 people and displaced about 200,000 from their homes.

Chinese companies have major investments in South Sudan's oil industry.  

On Sunday, South Sudan Information Minister Michael Makuei says the government will not let the detainees go as part of the talks.

"We are not ready to negotiate on preconditions. This is why we are here. The question of the releases should not be annexed to the successful peace talks. We came here to talk peace without conditions and to come and tell us that 'release these people so that they talk' is a condition and we are not ready to accept any precondition," said Makuei.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Sunday his government will support those seeking peace, but will work for international pressure against those who use force to gain any advantage.  Kerry said to reporters in Jerusalem, negotiations must be serious - not a "gimmick."

The talks in Ethiopia are being mediated by the East African regional bloc IGAD (Intergovernmental Authority on Development).

South Sudan's unrest began December 15 when renegade soldiers attacked an army headquarters.  President Kiir accused Machar of a coup attempt.  Machar has called for the army to overthrow the president.

Witnesses say some of the violence is ethnically motivated, with supporters of Kiir, a member of the Dinka tribe, and supporters of Machar, from the Nuer tribe, targeting each other.

You May Like

US Imposes Sanctions on Alleged Honduran Drug Gang

Treasury department alleges Los Valles group is responsible for smuggling tens of thousands of kilograms of cocaine into US each month More

At 91, Marvel Creator Stan Lee Continues to Expand his Universe

Company's chief emeritus hopes to interest new generation of children in superheroes of all shapes and sizes by publishing content across multiple media platforms More

Photogallery New Drug Protects Against Virus in Ebola Family

Study by researchers at University of Texas Medical Branch, Tekmira Pharmaceuticals is first looking at drug's effectiveness after onset of symptoms More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Kueth gach from: Ethiopia
January 07, 2014 10:57 AM
His visit was not fruitfull,bashir is the most wanted criminal by ICC, so he not puts things in order.is a big abettor


by: peter jal from: USA
January 07, 2014 2:24 AM
Bashir, do not involve in the South Sudanese affair the world will treated as a international innovation, because Sudan and South Sudan they are two different countries, that decision of join forces with South Sudan will lead both of you to leave these countries for your misconduct against humanity, you know very well that South Sudan has 64 tribes one of them has been fighting 63 tribes plus Uganda, and North Sudan now and they will still tolerate if you are going to murdering Nuer because of the resources in the Nuer land this oil will poisoning both of you.


by: Chuol Both from: Ethiopia
January 06, 2014 8:24 PM
I am skeptical about Bashir's visit to Juba and the remark has made, saying that he will not support the rebels. He is a muderer. Let him just go to ICC.

In Response

by: South Sudanese from: Juba
January 09, 2014 4:36 AM
I want to reply to peter jal that not all 63 tribes of South Sudanese are fighting the rebels group headed by Dr. Riek.


by: Chuol Both from: Ethiopia
January 06, 2014 8:04 PM
Where is democracy? Where are the best and faithful analysts to help those South sudanese in this terrible situation? John Kerry and IGAD mediators actually want more bloodshed if they fail to urge the release of all the arrested politicians who are expected to participate in the peace process. If they are alive why is it difficult to let them participate?


by: ali baba from: new york
January 06, 2014 3:01 PM
Omar el Bashir is a war criminal that should be arrested and bring to the international court for his crime against humanity. he is the one who causes two civil war.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improvingi
X
Carol Pearson
August 19, 2014 11:43 PM
The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video Five Patients Given Experimental Ebola Drug Said to Be Improving

The World Health Organization has approved the use of experimental treatments for Ebola patients in West Africa. The Ebola outbreak there is unprecedented, the disease deadly. The number of people who have died from Ebola has surpassed 1,200. VOA's Carol Pearson reports on the ethical considerations of allowing experimental drugs to be used.
Video

Video In Ukraine, Fear and Distrust Remain Where Fighting has Stopped

As the Ukrainian military reclaims control of eastern cities from pro-Russian separatists, residents are getting a chance to rebuild their lives. VOA's Gabe Joselow reports from the town of Kramatorsk in Donetsk province, where a sense of fear is still in the air, and distrust of the government in Kyiv still runs deep.
Video

Video China Targets Overseas Assets of Corrupt Officials

As China presses forward with its anti-graft effort, authorities are targeting corrupt officials who have sent family members and assets overseas. The efforts have stirred up a debate at home on exactly how many officials take that route and how likely it is they will be caught. Rebecca Valli has this report.
Video

Video Leading The Fight Against Islamic State, Kurds Question Iraqi Future

Western countries including the United States have begun arming the Kurdish Peshmerga forces in northern Iraq to aid their battle against extremist Sunni militants from the Islamic State. But there are concerns that a heavily-armed Kurdistan Regional Government, or KRG, might seek to declare independence and cause the break-up of the Iraqi state. As Henry Ridgwell reports from London, the KRG says it will only seek greater autonomy from Baghdad.
Video

Video In Rural Kenya, Pressure Builds Against Female Circumcision

In some Kenyan communities, female genital mutilation remains a rite of passage. But activists are pushing back, with education for girls and with threats of punishment those who perform the circumcision. Mohammed Yusuf looks at the practice in the rural eastern community of Tharaka-Nithi.
Video

Video For Obama, Racial Violence is Personal Issue

The racial violence in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson is presenting U.S. President Barack Obama with an issue to which he has a deep personal connection. To many Americans, Obama's election as America's first black president marked a turning point in race relations in the United States, and Obama has made ending the violence a policy priority. On Monday he issued a new call for calm and understanding. Luis Ramirez reports from the White House.
Video

Video Clinton-Obama Relationship Could Impact 2016 Election

President Barack Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have a long and complicated relationship. That relationship took another turn recently when Clinton criticized the president’s foreign policy. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone reports there is renewed attention on the Clinton-Obama relationship as Hillary Clinton considers running for
Video

Video Iran Looks to Maintain Influence in Baghdad With New Shia PM

Washington and Tehran share the goal of stopping Syrian-based militants in Iraq. But experts say it's Iran, not the United States, that will most influence how the new government in Baghdad approaches internal reforms and the war in Syria. VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns has the story.

AppleAndroid